"Are we prepared to promote conditions in which the living contact with God can be reestablished? For our lives today have become godless to the point of complete vacuity. God is no longer with us in the conscious sense of the word. He is denied, ignored, excluded from every claim to have a part in our daily life." - Alfred Delp, S.J.

Wednesday, April 08, 2015

I baked you that cake you wanted ...






H/T source

12 comments:

  1. Memo to self, do not order cake from the Addams Bakery.

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  2. I wonder what a cake or any other food tastes like when it is done without effort, love, joy, pride, one's mojo, a smile, in complete freedom, willfully, hoping one's client will savor it and enjoy the beauty of good flavor made with much love.

    BAD is all I gotta say. ;p ;p

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  3. And the gay client says to the stupid baker as he eyes his shop decor.."Really Debbie......pastels???"

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  4. +JMJ+

    Over a decade ago, I took an introductory course on British Business Law. One thing that I remember from it is that one contracted service that you cannot force someone to perform if he tries to break the contract is construction . . . because the risk of the building being too dangerous to live or to work in is too great.

    Terry, you're not the only one who has pointed out that "forced" wedding cakes can't be expected to be of the quality of "willing" wedding cakes (not necessarily because of baker's sabotage [How's that for a legal term? LOL!] but certainly because the baker's heart won't be in it); and this has made me wonder about US business law . . . If a baker were compelled to bake a cake that he didn't want to bake, and for whatever reason, the cake were not up to snuff, could a second suit be filed against him?

    Or are lawsuits a long and winding road that never ends?

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    Replies
    1. The burden of proof would be on the client I think - he would have to prove the product was inferior to similar product the firm consistently produced. Judge Judy might take the case. LOL!

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  5. Why in the world would anyone want to purchase a cake from a baker who strongly disapproves of the reason for the cake, no matter what the occasion?

    Here in Denver there are bakers who specialize in obscene pastries and you name it, why not go there?

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    Replies
    1. Maybe they don't want an obscene cake?

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    2. Why order a cake from someone who believes marriage is between a man and woman? What's the benefit, other than to try forcing people to violate their religious beliefs?

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    3. +JMJ+

      My mother used to order all my little brothers' birthday cakes from a bakery called Kink Cakes, because they were the cheapest deal in town. Although they specialised in pornographic stuff, they could also do Barney, Transformers, Cars, or whatever the client asked.

      I can't say that the quality was very good, but that just meant no one ever asked about the bakery. LOL! And as long as the box was thrown away before guests arrived for the birthday parties, no one ever got scandalised.

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    4. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    5. Mack Malone,

      Because they also bake cakes that are not obscene, i.e. the you name it part of the business. The point is, the store would not object to whatever was asked for in regard to sexual matters.

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    6. I'm with LTG - why would anyone want to do business with someone who doesn't want their business? Although the answer to that seems obvious - they simply want to make a civil case out of it and make an example of the uncooperative business owner.

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