Friday, April 30, 2010

Santo Toribio Romo Gonzalez, patron of immigrants.


St. Toribio Romo González
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This young saint is credited with assisting Mexican immigrants in marvelous ways.  It is said St. Toribio sometimes appears to immigrants who travel from Mexico to the United States and guides them safely through the desert.  I am praying to him for the immigrants in our country - especially those subject to Arizona law.
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U.S. Bishops oppose Arizona Law SB 1070
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In a statement released April 27, the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops denounced a recently signed Arizona law that criminalizes undocumented immigrants, calling the legislative move “draconian” and saying it “could lead to the wrongful questioning and arrest of U.S. citizens.”
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Writing on behalf of the USCCB, Bishop John C. Wester of Salt Lake City, chairman of the U.S. bishops' committee on Migration, noted that he joins Arizona’s bishops in “strongly opposing” the implementation of SB 1070, which was signed into law by Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer last Friday.

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According to ABC news, the new Arizona law makes it a crime to be in the state illegally and allows police to arrest and question suspected individuals about their status without a warrant. It also criminalizes transporting illegal immigrants anywhere in Arizona, even if by family members.
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“This new law, although limited to the State of Arizona, could have impact throughout the nation, in terms of how members of our immigrant communities are both perceived and treated,” Bishop Wester said." - Source 

Short biography of St. Toribio.
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Born in Santa Ana de Guadalupe, which belongs to the parish of Jalostotitlán, Jal. (Diocese of San Juan de los Lagos), 16 April 1900. Vicar functions pastor in Tequila, Jalisco., (Archdiocese of Guadalajara). Priest sensitive heart, assiduous prayer. Passionate about the Eucharist asked many times: "Lord, let me not a single day of my life without saying Mass without Communion hold in'. In a First Communion, to take the Sacred Host in his hands, said: "And would accept my blood, Lord, I offer you the peace of the Church? 'While in Aguascalientes, a location near Tequila that served as refuge and center of his ministry, he wanted to acquaint the parish. Worked on Friday all day and all night. At five in the morning of Saturday February 25, 1928, wanted to celebrate the Eucharist but, feeling very tired and sleepy preferred to celebrate a little sleep better. He had hardly fallen asleep when a group of agrarians and soldiers entered the room and when one of them pointed, saying, "That's the priest, kill him"Father Toribio woke up scared, stood up and received a discharge. Wounded and walked a little hesitant, a new download, in the back, cut the life of the martyr and his generous blood that reddened the land of Jalisco Canyon. - Vatican website
Prayer
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Holy Father, you who sent your Son to proclaim the Kingdom of Heaven to us, and He, obedient to your will, carried out the mission you gave Him to do, we pray that through the intercession of St. Toribio:
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You care for and guide members of our families that have had to leave their homes for distant lands to improve their lives and those of their families. Keep them safe from harm and help them to stay firm in their Faith so that they can soon return to their homes strengthened in soul and body.
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Through Christ our Lord, Amen
(St. Toribio Romo Shrine)


Links:
Toribio Romo Gonzalez
Biography in Spanish
Chronology in English
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19 comments:

  1. Granted that the current law in question from Arizona may be missing the mark, I was under the assumption that the Church does not support illegal immigration.

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  2. Hi Patrick - while that may be true, the Church remains concerned for the temporal and spiritual welfare of these people, legal or illegal. As for St. Toribio, I don't think he asks his clients for papers before he helps them. Pretty cool, huh? ;)

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    1. Yes he is amazing thank u for terry iam related to toribio his niece maria named after his sis is my great grandma my grandpa magdaleno romo gonzalez is his great nephew I just wanna thank u

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  3. Thanks for introducing me to this wonderful intercessor, and for talking about this issue.

    Patrick, no human being is illegal.

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  4. Yes, pretty cool. Certainly, the Church is concerned about the welfare of everyone. I was wondering more about the distinction between helping people's immediate situation as opposed to helping them towards breaking the law (further). I'm guessing St. Toribio was concerned for their welfare at large, apart from "papers".

    And thanks for that reminder, Thom. Very helpful.

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  5. Austringer12:26 PM

    The Church is (and rightly so) concerned for the temporal and spiritual needs of all people, whether they are in a country legally or not.

    But it does make me wonder: does the Church recognize a state or country's right to maintain its own borders and/or restrict benefits to those who are here legally? I am not being provocative: I honestly don't know and am hoping you more astute types can help me here.

    I was under the impression that we were obligated to observe the laws of our government, insofar as they were "true" laws as Aquinas would define them. (In other words, if they were in violation of natural law, such as laws protecting abortion and enshrining it as a "right", they were not really laws at all and so we're not obligated to respect them.) So, I would assume for the Church to support illegal immigration (which, by denouncing the state's decision enforce the law, it would appear it does), some over-riding natural law must be at stake. If so, what is it? What makes it odd to me is that our country allows for legal immigration -- it's not as if we've put up a big "Members Only -- Keep Out" sign.

    Don't assume I am against immigration -- I'm not. Frankly, if it weren't for the large numbers of Hispanic immigrants, the US's birth rate would be similar to those in Europe, which is dying and can't or won't seem to figure out why. But obviously I would prefer people who are here to be here legally.

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  6. I will probably come across as being very cruel, but illegals are just that-ILLEGALS..by coming into this country without the proper permissions and paperwork or visas they have broken the law, and they know it...and then when they feel thay can drag families in on it and get sympathy that way, I lose all compassion. Utah is also struggling with an illegal/anchor baby situation, they use resources meant for American citizens, bring in gang/drug/prostitution/murder problems, burden the education and medical systems, suppress wages for hard-working Americans by working for $20 a day, and refuse to learn English and assimilate into American society. People fuss about "papers"--well just about every other country I have lived in required you to carry some kind of paper showing your citizenship, and the police could ask for it at any time for any reason.

    I understand our Bishops having compassion, as yes they are human beings, however many of them---including Utah's own bishop--overlook the "illegal" aspect and show them far too much sympathy..yes bishops, feed and clothe them for a couple of days, then give them a one-way ticket back to where they came from...

    And as far as no jobs in Mexico--that is a bunch of crap--I was on a cruise to Mexico a couple of years ago, Matazlan had so many building projects under construction and partly finished because they couldn't get enough workers.. there is plenty of construction work in Mexico..

    Sara

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  7. Sara, I had to look twice to see that that comment came from you. It doesn't seem like your usual level-headed response.

    So many of those issues that you (incorrectly) attributed to one's "illegal" status are the same justifications used by many against the Irish, and against a multitude of migrants in other countries. Like it or not, it's xenophobia. One's "legal" status does not affect crime; one need look only at US crime rates to see that.

    No human being is illegal.

    What's a border?

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  8. Thom,

    I can't tell if you're being serious or glib and flippant.

    A good breakdown of the issues can be found here:


    http://insidecatholic.com/Joomla/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=7970&Itemid=48

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  9. Patrick, I'm serious, and I'll take JP2 over "inside catholic" any day.

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  10. Can you flesh that out please? I doubt JP2 was an advocate for illegal immigration.

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  11. Vox Nova had a nice quote today:

    "Migration is assuming the features of a social emergency, above all because of the increase in illegal migrants which, despite the current restrictions, it seems impossible to halt. Illegal immigration has always existed: it has frequently been tolerated because it promotes a reserve of personnel to draw on as legal migrants gradually move up the social ladder and find stable employment.

    [...]

    The Church considers the problem of illegal migrants from the standpoint of Christ, who died to gather together the dispersed children of God (cf. Jn 11:52), to rehabilitate the marginalized and to bring close those who are distant, in order to integrate all within a communion that is not based on ethnic, cultural or social membership, but on the common desire to accept God’s word and to seek justice. “God shows no partiality, but in every nation any one who fears him and does what is right is acceptable to him” (Acts 10:34-35).

    [...]

    Thus it is important to help illegal migrants to complete the necessary administrative papers to obtain a residence permit. Social and charitable institutions can make contact with the authorities in order to seek appropriate, lawful solutions to various cases. This kind of effort should be made especially on behalf of those who, after a long stay, are so deeply rooted in the local society that returning to their country of origin would be tantamount to a form of reverse emigration, with serious consequences particularly for the children.

    [...]

    In the search for a solution to the problem of migration in general and illegal migrants in particular, the attitude of the host society has an important role to play. In this perspective, it is very important that public opinion be properly informed about the true situation in the migrants’ country of origin, about the tragedies involving them and the possible risks of returning. The poverty and misfortune with which immigrants are stricken are yet another reason for coming generously to their aid.

    [...]

    It is necessary to guard against the rise of new forms of racism or xenophobic behaviour, which attempt to make these brothers and sisters of ours scapegoats for what may be difficult local situations.

    Due to the considerable proportions reached by the illegal migrant phenomenon, legislation in all the countries involved should be brought into harmony, also for a more equitable distribution of the burdens of a balanced solution. It is necessary to avoid recourse to the use of administrative regulations, meant to restrict the criterion of family membership which result in unjustifiably forcing into an illegal situation people whose right to live with their family cannot be denied by any law.

    Adequate protection should be guaranteed to those who, although they have fled from their countries for reasons unforeseen by international conventions, could indeed be seriously risking their life were they obliged to return to their homeland.

    [...]

    In the Church no one is a stranger, and the Church is not foreign to anyone, anywhere. As a sacrament of unity and thus a sign and a binding force for the whole human race, the Church is the place where illegal immigrants are also recognized and accepted as brothers and sisters. It is the task of the various Dioceses actively to ensure that these people, who are obliged to live outside the safety net of civil society, may find a sense of brotherhood in the Christian community.

    [...]

    “I was a stranger and you welcomed me” (Mt 25:35). It is the Church’s task not only to present constantly the Lord’s teaching of faith but also to indicate its appropriate application to the various situations which the changing times continue to create. Today the illegal migrant comes before us like that “stranger” in whom Jesus asks to be recognized. To welcome him and to show him solidarity is a duty of hospitality and fidelity to Christian identity itself."

    –Pope John Paul II–Message for World Migration Day, 1996.

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  12. We cannot welcome everyone to the USA..that is why we have a system to determine who can have student visas, who are bona fide refugees political or religious, who are other types of immigrants. We welcome plenty.

    Those who feel that they do not have to obey our laws and can skirt system make it that much more difficult for the bona fide immigrants/refugees...

    I grew up in Southern California when the Vietnamese/Cambodian "boat people" started arriving...even though there were poorly educated (if any and only had the clothes ontheir backs, America was gracious and led them a hand...they settled in, started small businesses, had their kids learn English IMMEDIATELY, paid taxes,and were productive members of society--in fact many of their children went on to become high school validictorians, and distinguished college graduates.

    They did it right....the illegals in MY community hide in the shadows, refuse to learn English, do not pay taxes, shelter criminals because of "fear of the INS hauling everyone away"--this happened just recently in Utah with a double-murder--mafioso-style--run down neighborhoods by living 20-30 people to a household in violation of city codes, do not maintain properties, do not send children to school etc etc. It is interesting when I go shopping after work and accidently have on my US Government ID badge how some people just scurry away...they know what they are doing is wrong...

    And besides isn't it a rather serious sin to knowingly break laws such as these, to include harboring and giving comfort and jobs to illegals?? I don't see the long lines at the confessional..

    Now granted not all illegals live this way, but in MY community a fair majority of them DO, enough to cause considerable strain on our social services...

    If they truely want to immigrate to the USA because of whatever problem in their home nation, get in line with everyone else...

    And by the way--I am a grandaughter of immigrants--who did it RIGHT...they went through Ellis Island.

    Sara

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    1. Lucky for you your grandparents were able to go through Ellis Island while it was still legal. Or else you wouldn't be so judgmental. In reality we are all immigrants whether legal or not we are here, how about we make the best of it and stop the hate. No matter what you say or what you think or how mean you are to those not lucky enough to have migrated "the right way" we are all still human beings.

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  13. What a beautiful life this Saint gives us...thank you, Terry. I have never heard of him.
    His complete dedication to the Holy Mass is such an inspiration to me as a priest and a religious.
    May he pray for us all in this very contentious time; I'm so darned dumb about these issues; I'll remain silent for now...it's just better that way:<)!

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  14. Father - isn't he a fine example of a holy priest though? Holy charity.

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  15. Watch "For Greater Glory" and you will learn about my distant cousin Saint Toribio Romo who was shot during the Cristero War because he was a priest. Proud History! I am glad my grandfather made it to America had my mom, who had me and I just served 24 years in the US Army. I thank my grandfather, but more importantly I thank my Mexican ancestors who fought for religious freedom and didn't fall for the government trap to follow Roman rule. Fight all you want about right and wrong we are here to stay.

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  16. Dave Gonzalez - thanks for writing - you are fortunate to have an uncle so holy.

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  17. Cesar Milan crossed the border with fear and great sacrifice too. Now he's famous.

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