"Are we prepared to promote conditions in which the living contact with God can be reestablished? For our lives today have become godless to the point of complete vacuity. God is no longer with us in the conscious sense of the word. He is denied, ignored, excluded from every claim to have a part in our daily life." - Alfred Delp, S.J.

Sunday, July 10, 2016

Who is my neighbor?

Who was neighbor to the robbers' victim?

Who was neighbor to the slave, the imprisoned?
St. Peter Claver pray for us.

Who was neighbor to the homeless, the disabled, the jobless?
St. Vincent de Paul pray for us.

Who was neighbor to the sick poor, the diseased?
St. Aloysius Gonzaga pray for us.

Who was neighbor to the outcast?
St. Camillus de Lellis pray for us.

Who was neighbor to the street people, the mentally ill?
St. John of God pray for us.

Who was neighbor to the brigands, the robbers, those suspected of crime?
St. Angelo pray for us.


The sparrow finds a home,
and the swallow a nest for her young:
by your altars, 
O Lord of hosts,
my King and my God.
Blessed are they who dwell
in your house,
for ever singing your praise.
-Communion Antiphon


If we can't help someone - we can at least leave them alone so someone who cares can do so - pass them by like the priest did, like the Levite did.  Congratulate yourself for not defiling yourself or getting yourself sullied.  Be at peace, pass them by, and let the Samaritan take care of him.

If and when we really want to help, we need to quit judging, quit condemning, and help one another - and if we can't help, we need to pray for help for ourselves.  We need to seek help.  We need to pray for a heart of flesh, a heart of mercy... then maybe we can treat one another with mercy.


The one who treated him with mercy.


  1. On the flip side, Scott Hahn posted an interesting meditation on this today. "In his compassion, the Samaritan in Jesus' parable reveals the boundless mercy of God - who came down to us when we were fallen in sin, close to dead, unable to pick ourselves up...Like the Samaritan, He pays the price for us, heals the wounds of sin, pours out on us the oil and wine of the sacraments, and entrusts us to the care of His church, until He comes back for us."

    1. Now that is edifying. Thanks Angela.

    2. This is one of my favorite Gospels but I had never thought to put myself in the place of the one needing help. I have experienced His healing and found I was better able to help others after I had let myself be helped. Interesting...

    3. Same here. Really.

  2. The allegory drawn out by the Church Fathers on this parable is brilliant. Thomas Aquinas particularly I think. Even the beginning of the parable: "A man was making his way down from Jerusalem to Jericho...", that is, walking away from holiness and grace and thus falling into sin.

  3. hey! what's with the off center pics? I have the same problem on my blog...I think by linking to Ann B. she put me off center!


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