"Are we prepared to promote conditions in which the living contact with God can be reestablished? For our lives today have become godless to the point of complete vacuity. God is no longer with us in the conscious sense of the word. He is denied, ignored, excluded from every claim to have a part in our daily life." - Alfred Delp, S.J.

Saturday, February 06, 2016

Autoeroticism ... it too is intrinsically and gravely disordered

Dali - Temptation of St. Anthony
I may be wrong but I think early moral theologians
used the word voluptuousness when writing about
this particular vice.  It is also known as self-abuse.


Fr. Charles OFM Cap has a very good post:  On Masturbation

A lot of people have difficulty with this habit, also popularly known as, self-pleasuring, a sexual practice which in the 'world' or secular-pop-erotic culture, is considered healthy and normal and necessary.  (I never knew women did it, much less taught it, until I watched Oprah.)  That's not Catholic teaching however.

It's a habitual sin one can overcome with the help of grace:  By the practice of prayer, recourse to the sacrament of penance as often and as frequently as needed, amid calm, peaceful struggle - which for some means constant struggle - but it is important to have confidence in God - to keep yourself in peace.  Agitation and stress often complicates and confuses one in the heat of battle, as it were, and is therefore not helpful.  Never give up.

Fr. Charles concludes his post with these helpful counsels...

The key thing about any struggle with a sinful habit is just that, to struggle. Even given all these considerations and the probability that a small percentage of acts of masturbation are mortally sinful, it's still a sin and worth struggling against for the sake of blessedness and peace in this life and the next. So be about the struggle. Do the detective work on yourself to find the occasions of sin, the times of the day or the week when you are vulnerable to temptation, the negative emotions that set you up for falls. Look for opportunities to treat others with chastity, that is to say according to their dignity as God's creatures and not according to any use they might have for you. Avoid, as much as is practical, the world's unchaste entertainments and advertising. Receive Holy Communion devoutly and know that in that sacrificed Body your soul is made clean in the righteousness of Christ. Go to confession regularly. Pray your rosary and ask Our Lady to pray for you for the grace of chastity. Read books that encourage chastity and give practical advice on obtaining it, like Benedict Groeschel's The Courage to be Chaste.
When dealing with sinful habits the real moral and spiritual danger is perhaps not the occasional slip or fall into the behavior, but giving into discouragement, despair, or the doubt that God's love is abiding that can lead to scruples. The question of being a Christian is not whether to be a 'saint' or a 'sinner,' but of deciding what kind of sinner you want to be; the sinner who lets sins lead to discouragement and an increasing selfishness, or the sort of sinner who allows the experience of sin to lead to humility and an abiding awareness of the immense mercy of God, a mercy which one can then radiate to others. - Read the entire post here.

Find a good confessor.
St. Leopold Mandic, pray for us.


3 comments:

  1. Isn't the general rule that anything Oprah says isn't Catholic teaching? What?

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thanks for the encouragement!

    ReplyDelete
  3. It looks to me as if St. Leopold Mandic is saying, 'You can do it; be steadfast'!, with the gesture of his fist. What a great priest to have been able to go to Confession to, and others like him, too.

    ReplyDelete


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