"Are we prepared to promote conditions in which the living contact with God can be reestablished? For our lives today have become godless to the point of complete vacuity. God is no longer with us in the conscious sense of the word. He is denied, ignored, excluded from every claim to have a part in our daily life." - Alfred Delp, S.J.

Monday, June 17, 2013

Judge lays down the law: Modesty in the court! No bare arms!

“Someone needs to tell women that sundresses are not proper..."

This is so weird because I just noticed a mother walking her daughter home from the park and she appeared to wearing a vintage style sleeveless blouse.  My mother and sister used to wear blouses like that - and dresses.  In those days a woman had to slip on a long sleeved sweater before going to Mass however, since sleeveless was considered immodest.  A pastor, like a judge, can impose rules regarding modesty, but few do, and I suspect even fewer judges do.

So anyway - after thinking about that woman and her ugly blouse, I went online and noticed the following story about a Tennessee judge telling female lawyers in his courtroom to cover up.
Charlotte) — A Tennessee judge wants female lawyers to dress more appropriately while in his courtroom. 
The Tennessean reports that Rutherford County Circuit Judge Royce Taylor has outlined in the Rutherford County Bar newsletter that women are showing too much skin while defending their clients. 
“I have advised some women attorneys  that a jacket with sleeves below the elbow is appropriate or a professional dress equivalent,” the letter states, according to The Tennessean. “Your personal appearance in court is a reflection upon the entire legal profession.”
Taylor tells WSMV-TV that he has been receiving complaints about their attire.
“Most of the complaints came from the attorneys wearing sleeveless attire,” Taylor told WSMV. “In one case I had one to appear in a golf shirt, a woman. I didn’t feel that was appropriate.”  - Source

I agree with the judge.  Men have to dress appropriately, I think women should too - for court that is.  Tank-tops and shorts may be okay for church, but not court.  Will someone please tell Mrs. Obama?

What if male lawyers dressed like that?

Bonus:  Kat wanted to be a lawyer but she couldn't pass the bar - without stopping in.  I'm so kidding.  Love her so much.  So much!


Marylike Standards of Dress for Court:
1. "Marylike" means modesty without compromise -- "like Mary," Christ's pure and spotless Mother.
2. Marylike dresses have sleeves extending to the wrists; and skirts reaching the ankles.
3. Marylike dresses require full and loose coverage for the bodice, chest, shoulders, and back; the cut-out about the neck must not exceed "two fingers breadth under the pit of the throat" and a similar breadth around the back of the neck.
4. Marylike dresses also do not admit as modest coverage transparent fabrics -- laces, nets, organdy, nylons, etc. -- unless sufficient backing is added. Fabrics such as laces, nets, organdy may be moderately used as trimmings only.
5. Marylike dresses avoid the improper use of flesh-colored fabrics.
6. Marylike dresses conceal rather than reveal the figure of the wearer; they do not emphasize, unduly, parts of the body.
7. Marylike dresses provide full coverage, even after jacket, cape or stole are removed.
8. Marylike fashions are designed to conceal as much of the body as possible, rather than reveal. This would automatically eliminate such fashions as slacks, jeans, shorts, culottes, tight sweaters, sheer blouses, and sleeveless dresses; etc. The Marylike standards are a guide to instill a "sense of modesty." A girl or woman who follows these, and looks up to Mary as her ideal and model, will have no problem with modesty in dress. She will not be an occasion of sin or source of embarrassment or shame to others. - Catholic League 
BTW -  Did you know there used to be a thing called 'blessed dresses' for women?  They were modest and blessed and may even have had an indulgence attached - I'll have to look that up.

Oh!  Oh!  BTW-II! Since someone mentioned pants:  Simcha Fisher is on Patheos now.  I saw it coming when Mark almost spilled the beans a few weeks ago.

"No panty-line though -
I hate that myself!
No whale-tail either.


  1. This is America. The Second Amendment to the Constitution gives us the right to bare arms.

    1. Ha ha. Like.

    2. I forgot to add - I like too!

  2. Where did you get those insane guidelines from? Wrists to ankles? Do SSPXers even dress like that?

    And isn't there something amiss in treating Mary as an arbiter of puritanical rules?

  3. And as far as the blessed dresses go ... who knows? But there also used to be things like "modesty sheets" with a hole cut in them so spouses could procreate without having to see each other naked, and there also used to be special wands for tucking in shirts so men would accidentally touch themselves down there.

    I guess what I'm saying is, is "more traditional" always better, or is it even more traditional (rather than say, an innovation of the 19th century)?

  4. Hi Merc! I missed you! ;)

  5. Dear Terry! This is so funny! I always enjoy your humor and love it that you include me. Thanks for always linking to my blog too! You are very sweet!



  6. I was a defendant in court once with my new baby (for rescuing a year earlier at a D.C. abortion mill). The prosecutor called my baby a "ploy" (LOL! Yes...I had a baby to take to court!) and the judge told me he'd hold me in contempt if I nursed in the courtroom. So I had to go sit in a separate room and watch my own trial on closed circuit TV. For that judge nursing a baby was evil, but killing one was okay. As I recall he refused the necessity defense.

    1. Talk about bias! I suppose you had no recourse however. You have been on the frontlines since very early on - God bless you!

  7. Patheos seems self-referential to me.


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