"Are we prepared to promote conditions in which the living contact with God can be reestablished? For our lives today have become godless to the point of complete vacuity. God is no longer with us in the conscious sense of the word. He is denied, ignored, excluded from every claim to have a part in our daily life." - Alfred Delp, S.J.

Sunday, April 26, 2015

I read the news today, oh boy ... Over two thousand dead in Nepal ...

And though the news was rather sad ...

I only read the Pope's message of consolation ...
His Holiness commends the souls of the victims to the loving mercy of the Almighty and he offers encouragement to the civil authorities and emergency personnel as they continue their rescue efforts and assistance to those touched by this tragedy. Upon them all he invokes the blessings of the Almighty as a pledge of healing and consolation. - Zenit
The death count will grow.

There will be more to come.

Prayers for the victims.



  1. "His Holiness commends the souls of the victims to the loving mercy of the Almighty"

    Can one pray in public for dead not in the Church?

    Souls don't become saved in great numbers among pagans just because one or two of them might have been in a state of grace and having a virtue of supernatural faith without its normal expressions, nor because someone, be it even the Pope "commends their souls" to God.

    Precisely as ordinations by Palmer don't become valid because same person, considered by some to be Pope gives him a Catholic Bishop's funeral rites.

    1. Mr. Lundahl,

      When considering your somewhat rhetorical question regarding the possible salvation of non-believers, it would be wise to look at the official teaching of the Church; this can be found in the Dogmatic Constitution on the Church, paragraph 16:

      "The plan of salvation also includes those who acknowledge the Creator. In the first place amongst these there are the Muslims, who, professing to hold the faith of Abraham, along with us adore the one and merciful God, who on the last day will judge mankind.

      Nor is God far distant from those who in shadows and images seek the unknown God, for it is He who gives to all men life and breath and all things, and as Saviour wills that all men be saved. Those also can attain to salvation who through no fault of their own do not know the Gospel of Christ or His Church, yet sincerely seek God and moved by grace strive by their deeds to do His will as it is known to them through the dictates of conscience.

      Nor does Divine Providence deny the helps necessary for salvation to those who, without blame on their part, have not yet arrived at an explicit knowledge of God and with His grace strive to live a good life. Whatever good or truth is found amongst them is looked upon by the Church as a preparation for the Gospel"

      So, it is clear that the Church teaches that salvation for non-believers is possible. Catholics are, of course, required to accept this teaching; thus Pope Francis is perfectly right to pray for the souls of those Nepalese who have died. God alone knows the condition of each soul and, as Nan has pointed out when referencing Scripture, all things are possible with God.

    2. You are presupposing Vatican II Lumen Gentium are a valid Council and a valid dogma.

      I do not think so.

      One need not be a Feeneyite to not accept Lumen Gentium as valid dogma. I did so accept it while yet being too blind to other more glaring problems with Vatican II.

      x "is perfectly right to pray for the souls of those Nepalese who have died"

      If they are private persons rather than priests and do not do so in public. Or perhaps OR do not do so in public, since the prayer of a private person is not the official public prayer of the Church anyway.

      When it comes to prayers made in public by the Church, the Church is not just bound to what it is POSSIBLE for God to hear, but also as to what is likely and unlikely he hears.

      Some time ago, I corresponded with a Nepalese who seemed to take me for a Pagan. He wanted me, for I don't exactly know what reason (and I prefer not to imagine) to act as figurehead for his ire against "evil missionaries".

      This means Nepalese are not more cut off from hearing God's good news by now, than they are from hearing the flattery (for basically it is such) of "Pope Francis".

      If strict Feeneyism is not per se true, the truth is at least by modern communications coming closer to it.

  2. "considered by some to be Pope COMMA" etc.

  3. That's up to God; Christians are a tiny minority in Nepal, less than 1% of the population, and we can't condemn those who haven't been evangelized. It isn't their fault if they haven't met Jesus. Papa commending their souls to God is merely a request for His lenience on those who haven't met His son and died suddenly so have no hope of meeting Him on earth. All things are possible with God.

    1. I agree with you Nan. I remember reading about this very subject too, in the Catechism of the Catholic Church.


Please comment with charity and avoid ad hominem attacks. I exercise the right to delete comments I find inappropriate. If you use your real name there is a better chance your comment will stay put.