See how the farmer waits for the precious fruit of the earth, being patient with it until it receives the early and the late rains. - James 5:7

Thursday, August 27, 2009

Teddy and the free pass to pro-choice.

So if priests and theologians and maybe even a cardinal or two tell you something that is a sin is not a sin, and you take their word for it and go ahead and do it, is it still a sin? And whose sin is it? Most of the Kennedy's were at one time pro-life - even when one of them forgot and left a woman in the car to drown - but it turns out some of the better minds in the American Catholic church were able to convince them otherwise.
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"Even Ted Kennedy, who gets a 100% pro-choice rating from the abortion-rights group Naral, was at one time pro-life. In fact, in 1971, a full year after New York had legalized abortion, the Massachusetts senator was still championing the rights of the unborn. In a letter to a constituent dated Aug. 3, 1971, he wrote: "When history looks back to this era it should recognize this generation as one which cared about human beings enough to halt the practice of war, to provide a decent living for every family, and to fulfill its responsibility to its children from the very moment of conception."
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But that all changed in the early '70s, when Democratic politicians first figured out that the powerful abortion lobby could fill their campaign coffers (and attract new liberal voters). Politicians also began to realize that, despite the Catholic Church's teachings to the contrary, its bishops and priests had ended their public role of responding negatively to those who promoted a pro-choice agenda.
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In some cases, church leaders actually started providing "cover" for Catholic pro-choice politicians who wanted to vote in favor of abortion rights. At a meeting at the Kennedy compound in Hyannisport, Mass., on a hot summer day in 1964, the Kennedy family and its advisers and allies were coached by leading theologians and Catholic college professors on how to accept and promote abortion with a "clear conscience."
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The former Jesuit priest Albert Jonsen, emeritus professor of ethics at the University of Washington, recalls the meeting in his book "The Birth of Bioethics" (Oxford, 2003). He writes about how he joined with the Rev. Joseph Fuchs, a Catholic moral theologian; the Rev. Robert Drinan, then dean of Boston College Law School; and three academic theologians, the Revs. Giles Milhaven, Richard McCormick and Charles Curran, to enable the Kennedy family to redefine support for abortion.
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Mr. Jonsen writes that the Hyannisport colloquium was influenced by the position of another Jesuit, the Rev. John Courtney Murray, a position that "distinguished between the moral aspects of an issue and the feasibility of enacting legislation about that issue." It was the consensus at the Hyannisport conclave that Catholic politicians "might tolerate legislation that would permit abortion under certain circumstances if political efforts to repress this moral error led to greater perils to social peace and order."
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Father Milhaven later recalled the Hyannisport meeting during a 1984 breakfast briefing of Catholics for a Free Choice: "The theologians worked for a day and a half among ourselves at a nearby hotel. In the evening we answered questions from the Kennedys and the Shrivers. .
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Though the theologians disagreed on many a point, they all concurred on certain basics . . . and that was that a Catholic politician could in good conscience vote in favor of abortion." - NYT (January 2, 2009)
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Some Catholics today seem to be bending over backwards trying to excuse the Kennedy's for their erroneous beliefs regarding faith and morals, blaming instead the bad priests the family surrounded themselves with. Perhaps covering up the bad stuff just because they are Catholic.

4 comments:

  1. Eunice Kennedy Shriver was pro-life to the end--the priest mentioned this at her funeral mass.

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  2. seems like all you got to do is die and then you are pardoned all offenses.... too bad it's not the press that will be judging us in the after all.

    I'll post more on this later

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  3. Even if we are tempted by evil--we have the free-will to resist--he had the free-will to resist evil, but instead decided to join forces with the dark--for political reasons? For money? For power? No matter what the reasons--he choose the evil.

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  4. He lost two incredible pro-life muses. Had the first one not been felled, perhaps abortion would still be thought murder. The second one had like 80 kids, God love him. Again, I think had he been President one day, abortion would still be thought the filthy business it is. No doubt this double loss of strength and mentoring affected him.

    But also, in this country, one can either be a politician or a Catholic. Never both. That last third of Camelot fell like bricks. Nonetheless, I haven't done 1/16th the good Ted went on to do, and I don't know many others who have, either. I'll leave him to God to sift, not to lucifer.

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