Wednesday, October 04, 2006

Joanna Bogle


Mrs. Bogle is on the left in this photo.

I've only known of her because she and her husband James have a show on EWTN, which I find charming and informative. Now Mrs. Bogle has a blog, that I find charming, homely, and somewhat informative. I like her very much, finding her much more engaging than her husband. (He tends to be a bit Trandemish for my taste...) However, I'm pleased to link to her blog.

Disappointed however that a comment I left was never answered - she has "comment moderation" operative. Here is a section of one of her posts I commented upon:

"In the evening, went to see the new film "The Queen" about events at Balmoral surrounding the death of Princes Diana. It shows the Queen in a sympathetic light, and altho' it presents Tony Blair as something of the hero of the hour, the message is also in the end a fairly positive one about monarchy and continuity. But I wondered where people like me fit in: I was not there among the weepers and mass-grief-and-floral-tributes crowd and thought it all absurd and frightening. But I am certainly not Royal and wasn't at Balmoral, nor am I a politician involved with making events happen. Where do ordinary patriots of a once-mainstream kind, with a love of British history and a sense of the continuity of things, fit in to a country which sees Royalty as soap-opera and which talks in psycho-babble or slogans?"

I asked her, as an American who cannot understand the British Monarchy, why they exist. The Monarch has no power and the lives of the Royals seem so shallow. I then asked why the phenomena of the great outpouring of sympathy for the Princess Diana was "absurd and frightening" in her opinion. I found it curious. Nevertheless, she did not post my comment, nor did she respond.

I work with people who are "monarchists" and several traditional Catholics seem to be as well. I don't get it at all. There is absolutely no remaining absolute monarchy remaining in the western world. What on earth is the attraction? Is it even plausible to hope that a monarchical system could be re-established?

I wish Mrs. Bogle would have responded to my comment. It's not very cordial for a Brit not to have done so. Of course the Queen often doesn't acknowledge anyone either. (Nobility has its privilege.) Which brings up another point - as far as the Church is concerned, or let's say, the faith, has there been a legitimate monarch since Henry VIII? After all, the rest have been schismatics and heretics - well except for maybe one or two Catholic monarchs. But is a pretend monarchy sufficient for continuity? Continuity of what?

During WWII, Elizabeth's parents, indeed the entire family, were certainly morale boosters. Elizabeth II has maintained herself well all of her life and presented a very dignified and respectful presence, yet she does not rule Britania. The monarchy is nothing but a figure head - they do not rule. I don't get it - what's the point? In my estimation, the British seem to be a collection of eccentrics - intelligent and cultured perhaps - yet sometimes rather eccentric.

7 comments:

  1. Good question, Terry-

    Maybe she doesn't understand the purpose of the monarchy, either.

    Haven't seen their show in a while- is it still on? I do like it...

    Going to check her blog out, also-

    thanks!

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  2. Elizabeth R10:24 PM

    We are not amused.

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  3. There is something basic in the human being that craves celebrity and monarchy. Security, certainly, and maybe familiarity.

    Look at our politicians. Do you think Hilary Clinton could have moved from Arkansas to NY and gotten elected Senator on the first try? Bobby Kennedy did the same thing.

    Reporters seriously propose George Bush's wife and brother as possible successors.

    Wives and children of Senators and Governors commonly succeed them.

    Many states have hereditary political dynasties like the LaFollettes in Wisconsin, the Byrds of Virginia, the Tafts in Ohio, the Kennedys in Massachusetts, Daleys in Chicago, etc.

    Sonny Bono became a Congressman from San Diego and "Gopher" became one from Iowa, I believe. John Glenn became a Senator and serious Presidential contender from Ohio.

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  4. There is something basic in the human being that craves celebrity and monarchy. Security, certainly, and maybe familiarity.

    Look at our politicians. Do you think Hilary Clinton could have moved from Arkansas to NY and gotten elected Senator on the first try? Bobby Kennedy did the same thing.

    Reporters seriously propose George Bush's wife and brother as possible successors.

    Wives and children of Senators and Governors commonly succeed them.

    Many states have hereditary political dynasties like the LaFollettes in Wisconsin, the Byrds of Virginia, the Tafts in Ohio, the Kennedys in Massachusetts, Daleys in Chicago, etc.

    Sonny Bono became a Congressman from San Diego and "Gopher" became one from Iowa, I believe. John Glenn became a Senator and serious Presidential contender from Ohio.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Well, here goes....I'm terribly sorry that you were offended that I didn't publish your comments or reply to you....but the system of comments on my blog doesn't provide for my being able to send you a direct personal reply. I had to track down your blog via Google, so here I am!!

    I have made clear on my blog that I honestly can't get involved in lengthy discussions except on specific issues largely related to Catholicism.....The blog's essentially a diary with Catholicism as its chief ideolgical component rather than any political issues. I like to steer the thing along those lines, and don't want to get side-tracked into debates with Americans - however delightful and friendly! - who quite obviously will have a different approach on Monarchy and our Royal Family.

    However, for what it's worth, my comment goes like this:
    America is a great and splendid nation, and one which has proved a blessing to many. It's a joyful place to visit, too - there is a sense of purpose and of welcome which lifts the heart. But itcertainly has its own version of an hereditary tradition within its political system: please don't try to say that the Bushes and the Kennedys and so on don't have hereditary power! The difference is just that: there is real power weilded by great families, rather as Britain had in its days of imperial authority. George Washington imposed his family's coat of arms as the nation's flag - no harm in that, and the flag has stood for prosperity and a decent way of life for millions, including those who arrived poor and hungry fleeing from real oppression and injustice.

    In Britain, we have found - not without some travail, including a bitter civil war between monarchists and their opponents - that a Monarchy and Parliamentary democracy work extremely well. We have adapted to massive social change without the struggles that this entailed in America (the "civil rights" movement, etc) and the sense of community and family that is engendered by our monarchy and its associated heritage has served us admirably. We look with pity on those European nations - France as perhaps the supreme example, currently in its 5th Republic with probably more to follow - that lack the blessings of stability bestowed on us.

    We don't specially expect Americans to value our monarchy as we do, and we recognise the value of their own tradition: there are many among us who despise and reject the crude anti-Americanism that frequently sweeps Europe, and we are not unmindful of the poignant graves of young American soldiers and airmen who lie with honour in our Cambridgeshire countryside, and of the sacrifice of life they gave with generous hearts in a war that preserved our freedom.

    When we speak our Queen, we don't, actually, mostly think in soap-opera terms - which is why we have been distressed by Royal events of recent years - but of the ideal of nationhood embodied in an anointed monarch consecrated to public service in a tradition stretching back through millenia. It's not an absurd idea, and we think it carries a quiet resonance at least as noble as anything that a larger republic can offer. What is likely to destroy it, tragically, is the loss of our nation's Christian identity: we admire Americans for their stalwart adherence to a Faith that many in Britain now denounce or deny.

    God Bless America!

    And, in this small island with a large history: God save the Queen!

    With warmest good wishes

    Joanna Bogle

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  6. I am so delightefully put in my place by Mrs Bogle's wonderful comment, that I more or less coercedfrom her. It shows just how little I know or understand of British history.
    Thank you Joanna!
    God save the Queen.

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  7. Ok...

    & maybe she does:)

    What a lovely thing for her to do!

    & thanks to you, Terry, I've got Mrs. Bogle's blogged linked, & am greatly enjoying my visits...

    Thanks to you both for your wonderful insights.

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