"Are we prepared to promote conditions in which the living contact with God can be reestablished? For our lives today have become godless to the point of complete vacuity. God is no longer with us in the conscious sense of the word. He is denied, ignored, excluded from every claim to have a part in our daily life." - Alfred Delp, S.J.

Thursday, February 25, 2016

The Holy Father is ill, they say.

"It was the Lord Himself who was knocking at the door, 
so that this man would open his heart and mercy would be able to enter. 
But no, he did not see, he was simply closed:
for him, outside the door there was nothing.” - Today's homily.


He cancelled appointments for the day because he has a fever.  

I wonder at his stamina - how he never stops, never takes a vacation - at his age!  I wondered how he avoids getting sick, being in daily contact with so many?  Today he has a fever and must rest - I pray he recovers quickly.

He still gave his homily this morning at S. Marta.  He was very much in my thoughts as I prayed this morning, reflecting on the readings at Mass.  I had hoped he would have had something to say on them, and I wasn't disappointed when I finally came online to check.

The beggar Lazarus, personifies for me the verse from Psalm 84, "I would rather lie abject on the threshold of the house of God than dwell in the tents of the wicked."

Pope Francis sees him as one on the peripheries ... Perhaps Lazarus represents those outside the wall the rich man builds to enclose or protect himself within, to pile up the riches and hoard the possessions he needs to make him feel 'great again'?  Those are my thoughts, not the Pope's.

I think the Pope sees or speaks of the Rich Man from an ecclesial point of view, from within the context of the Church:

“But he was a closed man, closed in his own little world – the world of banquets, of clothes, of vanity, of friends – a closed man, truly in a bubble of vanity. He didn’t have the ability to see others, only his own world. And this man did not recognize the things that happened beyond his closed world. For example, he didn’t think of the needs of so many people, or of the necessity of accompanying of the sick; he though only of himself, of his wealth, of his good life: he was given to the good life.” - Pope Francis


The Rich Man had the appearance of being religious - I consider that in the context of the Law.  Rituals of washing and cleansing, keeping away from the unclean - all the laws. The Pope says the Rich Man couldn't see a way to help the poor man, or those on the peripheries because of his being closed in on himself.

Carl Dobsky,The Lotus Eater

It makes me wonder.

The Pope often speaks about the exclusion of those on the peripheries by clergy, bishops and priests ... 'the teachers of the Law' - very much interested in advancing their careers.  This consideration reminds me of Luke 11:46 - “Woe also to you scholars of the law! You impose on people burdens hard to carry, but you yourselves do not lift one finger to touch them."  This is why I love the Holy Father so much, because he consistently goes out to lift those heavy burdens from those most in need, and he encourages us to do the same.

We are in Lent, the Pope noted, and it would do us good to ask ourselves what path we are travelling on:
“‘Am I on the road of life, or on the road of lies? How many ways is my heart still closed? Where is my joy: in doing, or in speaking? In going out of myself to meet others, to help them? The works of mercy, eh? Or is my joy in having everything organized, closed in on myself?’ Let us ask the Lord, while we’re thinking about it – no, throughout our life – for the grace of always seeing the Lazarus at our door, the Lazarus who knocks at our heart, and [the grace] to go out of ourselves with generosity, with the attitude of mercy, so that the mercy of God can enter into our hearts. - Pope Francis

The Holy Father always makes me want to be a better man.

How tortuous the human heart?



5 comments:

  1. I will be attending a Healing Mass later tonight so I will bring Papa Francis and everyone here with me to Mass and ask for healing according to God's holy will.

    I just read this and it makes me both sad and content:

    "He said being Pope gives him a sense of “calm,” and said that it is “a grace from God,” adding that it “feels as I am coming to the end of my life with so much peace.”"

    The above quote is from Vatican Radio reporting on our Holy Father's visit with the children who participated in his new book, "Dear Pope Francis."

    ReplyDelete
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    1. Oh - say a prayer for me - I need it. Thanks!

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    2. Always my friend. ^^

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  2. The Pope doesn't make me want to be a better man, rather he makes me want to scream "shut your freaking mouth!" Every time he does an interview he spreads confusion like wildfire.

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    1. I think he spread some clarity this time, as per my comment:

      New blog on the kid : So Bergoglio said that of Montini?
      http://nov9blogg9.blogspot.fr/2016/02/so-bergoglio-said-that-of-montini.html


      He clarified he understands neither medicine nor moral theology.

      Oh, among those taking him for Pope, yes, among them he might be spreading confusion, if that is what you mean.

      Delete


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