"Are we prepared to promote conditions in which the living contact with God can be reestablished? For our lives today have become godless to the point of complete vacuity. God is no longer with us in the conscious sense of the word. He is denied, ignored, excluded from every claim to have a part in our daily life." - Alfred Delp, S.J.

Tuesday, December 09, 2014

The guy with MS.



There is a man at church who has MS - at least I think it is that.  He uses a walker now.  He's young, somewhere in his 30's I'd guess.  He does everything on his own.  I've also seen him at the grocery store.  He always says 'hi' and gives me a big smile whenever I see him.

Last evening while leaving Mass, he did the same.  A smile so genuine and warm - as if he had seen an old friend.  He goes to Mass daily and I've seen him around for years.  I don't really know him though.  Last evening I ran to hold the door for him, but he didn't need assistance - "Ah, that's okay - I do this every day," he said.  He thanked me however, and I'm sure he knew I wasn't being patronizing.

Sure enough, he made his way out, down the stairs, and I expect, into his van, unassisted.  Obviously it is difficult for him to walk, to move and coordinate taking a step, handling the walker and doors, it's even difficult to speak clearly sometimes.  Yet he can look you in the eyes, he can smile, he can show kindness towards me, and of course, he does speak.  He's young, disabled, single, on his own - and it appears he doesn't want to bother anyone - and I doubt he complains about anything.  He volunteers at the parish, helps out with the youth, goes to daily Mass and adoration.

Like I said, he always has a smile on his face, and seems happy to see everybody.

I think he is 'full of grace' ...  I got the distinct impression that he really is holy.

He's okay ...


2 comments:

  1. on that note, I'm going to shut up now as I have ZILCH to complain about. wow.

    ReplyDelete
  2. This is what I will never get about Northerners. Y'all seem to notice so much about one another, but don't really seem to talk to one another. So many ships passing in the night. Here in South Louisiana one would not be considered rude if he asked that young man, "What happened to you, cher?" Many, many of our friendships begin with commiserating with one another. Southerners as a rule are frequently thought to have boundary issues, though. It's just a funny old world, innit?

    ReplyDelete


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