See how the farmer waits for the precious fruit of the earth, being patient with it until it receives the early and the late rains. - James 5:7

Friday, October 08, 2010

Silencing the lambs - the Bishops and new media.



Active participation going a little too far?
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Titles and cowtowing aside - the hierarchy doesn't seem to like hearing what the pew-sitters are thinking... and saying: 
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Many people believe that Catholic newspapers are being superseded by new media. But is that a good thing? The Catholic blogosphere is rude, argumentative, and fractious: it exposes the divisions of the Church in an ugly light. It flattens Church hierarchy, too: bishops and cardinals are abused regularly by Catholics in the pew.
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On the other hand, the online Catholic world has a huge amount of vitality and enthusiasm, and offers the kind of robust debate, and up-to-the-second coverage, that is not often found in traditional media. - Source
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As Anna Arco points out:
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In an age when people are cynical about the messages they receive from both the hierarchical Church and the traditional media and are used to spin the Catholic blogosphere can offer a refreshing antidote. Genuine discussion and genuine witness, by real people. - Source
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Art:  Bishop, Fernando Botero

2 comments:

  1. This is very upsetting and all most but not quite as upsetting as say our own CCCB blocking a federal access to information request by LifeSite News to reveal funding information of their partners (no problem, my D&P envelop remains empty with a note that I support Chalice.ca and other reputable Catholic charities) or say as upsetting as the fact that Novalis, Canada's premier Catholic publication firm publishes known dissidents "Sr" Joan Chittychat, dear brother Hans Kungfoo, and our very own Winnipeg Statement crafting Gregory the Baum among other non Magesterium abiding souls and refuses to answer back by email when asked as to why they do this.

    I'm just so upset.

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  2. Interesting post, Terry. I remember our Holy Father telling Catholics recently to use the internet to spread the faith, which I take to include blogging.

    We must be careful though, not to set bad examples of Catholicism on our blogs. I know my blogging style has changed greatly in the four years I have been at it. I used to post about all that annoyed me in our modern, faith-weakened world, but now I tend to just focus on the faith.

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