Wednesday, July 25, 2012

Loosen up: What does the youngest Cardinal, Woelki have to say about gay?

"I see things differently." - Woelki


The gay-Catholic 'movement' appears to have a Cardinal patron...

Maybe not, but Cardinal Woelke is certainly understanding and accepting of gay - as an alternative lifestyle.  He's been quoted before - or misquoted, depending upon which side of the fence his defenders happen to be - or not.  Confused?  Me too.  Ze Cardinal:
ZEIT: From the Catholic Congress a statement is quoted that has given you a lot of trouble. You said about homosexual relationships: "I think it is conceivable that, where people take responsibility for each other, where they live in a stable homosexual relationship, that is to be regarded in a similar manner to heterosexual relationships," Do you stand by this?
Woelki: "You must be careful not to mark down someone in an unfair way (literal translation of German- official English translation Every sign of unjust discrimination in their regard should be avoided) says the Catechism about people who have homosexual tendencies. If I take that seriously, I do not view in homosexual relationships "a violation of natural law" view, as expressed in the Catechism. I try to also perceive that as people they always assume responsibility for one another, loyalty to each other and have promised to provide, even though I cannot share such a life plan. The life plan for which we stand as the Catholic Church is a sacramental marriage between a man and a woman who is open to the transmission of life. This is what I said at the Catholic Congress in Mannheim immediately before the statement you quoted. Final section soon but that is the end of the passage on homosexuality- next is about the call to disobedience in the German and Austrian churches.
[...]
Article continues ZEIT: Why is the Church so hard about this? Woelki: Maybe it's a problem that today in the church everything must be almost over-correct. It must also be possible to be Catholic without every last detail being always checked. - Catholic Church Conservation
Which reminds me of the gay-Catholic thing and Courage...

I'm not sure where the new 'indulgence' is going, but the gay-Catholic thing seems to be making great strides.  This past Sunday was the conclusion of this year's annual Courage Conference, which featured a speaker who promotes 'queer' spirituality as well as supporting the notion of 'gay-Catholic'.  This is a departure from traditional spirituality as well as the objective of Courage apostolate - at least as far as I've always understood it.  Unfortunately I'm not in contact with anyone who attended the conference, so I am curious how this issue was handled and or addressed - if it at all.

That said, I'm not a member of Courage, but I highly recommend the original spirituality of the apostolate.  It should be noted that SSA Catholics have no obligation to attach themselves to any group, however, much of the research and writings of Fr. Harvey, and those authors he recommended, are very helpful to men and women seeking both to understand themselves and to live chaste lives in accordance with Catholic teaching.  Some people are not comfortable with groups, while others may find such group support helpful in difficult times.  I don't know if these groups are necessarily life-long commitments - it seems to me what is most important is attaining an integrated and balanced life in communion with the Catholic Church.

It seems to me the ultimate goal of the Christian life is one's sanctification and salvation - all that which is incompatible should be relinquished.  One can do that without a support group - which is important to note these days, since many of the 'gay-Catholic' voices criticize Courage as a 'coversion/reparative therapy' apostolate due to their close connection to NARTH.  That however, is an unfortunate mis-characterization.  The Catholic Church does not teach or require persons to change their orientation - the call is to chastity and sanctity.  Unfortunately, many 'gay-Catholics' - both the faithful and the 'progressive' portray the apostolate as a reparative therapy group.  It is not - or at least, it wasn't ever intended to be that.   The Church doesn't lay seemingly impossible burdens on people to carry, and most assuredly the Church does not require a person to spend their life savings on expensive therapies and such.  However, what is impossible to man, is possible to God - therefore, those who want to be 'healed' can be if God wills it - but that is not my discussion here.

Having said all of that, I think things are changing however:
I see things differently. For me, those souls who are critical are first of all Christians who love their church and are concerned: they suffer from the church or from some of her positions, but they are in church, and they are fighting for their church. - Woelki
TECHNOLOGIES OF THE SELF PERMIT INDIVIDUALS TO EFFECT BY THEIR OWN MEANS OR WITH THE HELP OF OTHERS A CERTAIN NUMBER OF OPERATIONS ON THEIR OWN BODIES AND SOULS, THOUGHTS, CONDUCT, AND WAY OF BEING, SO AS TO TRANSFORM THEMSELVES IN ORDER TO ATTAIN A CERTAIN STATE OF HAPPINESS, PURITY, WISDOM, PERFECTION, OR IMMORTALITY - Author unknown.
Confused?  Remember the words of Our Lord to St. Paul:
  "Courage!  My grace is enough for you!"

4 comments:

  1. I agree with you Terry. The Church calls all of its children to sanctity whatever their propensity toward disordered behaviour might be. I think that for many their whole world view is seen through the lense of same sex attraction. That is the lense through which everything in their life is seen and/or interpreted. I think whatever one's particular propensity toward disorder their is always a danger to cling to it and to somehow make it "good". There is a great fear of letting go of it. I think that clarity only comes with years of living a life that is separated from the "old man" "the old lifestyle". The clarity comes I believe when one is no longer a part of whatever disordered life one has led up to that point. When one can say, "I am no longer defined by my propensity toward sin and disorder" I really believe there needs to be a true Metanoia, a real turning away from that "old self image" and to living a new life in Christ.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hi Terry - have sent a message to your e-mail address...

    ReplyDelete


Please comment with charity and avoid ad hominem attacks. I exercise the right to delete comments I find inappropriate. If you use your real name there is a better chance your comment will stay put.