See how the farmer waits for the precious fruit of the earth, being patient with it until it receives the early and the late rains. - James 5:7

Tuesday, July 05, 2011

The little Cristero: Blessed Jose Luis Sanchez del Rio


A good example for boys and men.

Blessed José Luis Sánchez del Río (March 28, 1913 – February 10, 1928) was a young Mexican Cristero who was put to death by government officials because he refused to renounce his Catholic faith. He has been declared a martyr and was beatified by Pope Benedict XVI on November 20, 2005. - More.
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I love this kid, because like St. Peter Martyr who wrote "Credo" ("I believe") in his own blood as he was martyred, young Bl. Jose Luis took his finger, dipped in his own blood, to make the sign of the cross as he lay dying.
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An account of his martyrdom.
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"To break his resolve, he was made to watch the hanging of another Cristero that they had in custody, but instead José encouraged the man, saying that they would soon meet again in Heaven. In prison, José prayed the rosary daily and wrote an emotional letter to his mother, saying that he was ready to fulfill the will of God. His father attempted to raise a ransom to save him, but was not able to appease the government in time.
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Consequently they cut the bottom of his feet and obliged him to walk around the town toward the cemetery. They also at times cut him with a machete until he was bleeding from several wounds. He cried and moaned with pain, but he did not give in. At times they stopped him and said, ‘If you shout ‘Death to Christ the King’ we will spare your life.’ José would only shout, "I will never give in. Viva Cristo Rey!" When they reached the place of execution, they stabbed him numerous times with bayonets. He only shouted louder, "Viva Cristo Rey!" The commander was so furious that he pulled out his pistol and shot Blessed Jose Sanchez del Rio in the head. After being shot in the head, he drew in the ground a cross with his blood and kissed it as his time expired." - Sanchez del Rio died on the vigil of Our Lady of Lourdes, February 10, 1928

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Prayer

O Blessed José, littlest soldier of Christ, whose last bloody steps brought you to the arms of our Lady and our Lord, keep healthy and strong the steps of our Lord's soldiers who remain here on earth, such that they may have your strength to endure and persevere to the end. Amen

Viva Cristo Rey!

Blessed Jose Luis, watch over, defend and protect all of the children whose innocence is threatened from all sides by evil, direct their hearts to all that is good and holy, and instill in their hearts a living faith and confidence in the Sacred Heart of Jesus Christ our King and Lord.  Amen.


50 comments:

  1. good grief. and i complain about a blister on my heel. we have no idea what it takes, do we.

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  2. The depiction in the opening image seems a little at odds with Jesus, "Prince of Peace."

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  3. The depiction in the opening image seems a little at odds with Jesus, "Prince of Peace."

    So does His title "Lion of Judah". Whodathunkit?

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  4. Michael has a point. Regarding "Lion of Judah," the lion was actually the symbol of the literal tribe, Judah. Prophecy foretold that Jesus would be of Judaean descent, and he was. The Christian practice of calling Jesus "the Lion of Judah" is an acknowledgement of the fulfillment of prophecy, and Jesus' earthly heritage.

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  5. 'Do not think that I came to send peace upon earth: I came not to send peace, but the sword.

    'For I came to set a man at variance against his father, and the daughter against her mother, and the daughter in law against her mother in law.

    'And a man's enemies shall be they of his own household.

    'He that loveth father or mother more than me, is not worthy of me; and he that loveth son or daughter more than me, is not worthy of me.

    'And he that taketh not up his cross, and followeth me, is not worthy of me.

    'He that findeth his life, shall lose it: and he that shall lose his life for me, shall find it.'

    Have a look at the context in which Isaias calls Christ 'the Prince of Peace' (Isaias 9:6) - i.e. right after 'the Father of the World to Come'.

    The Peace of Christ is not the Peace of this World (John 14:27).

    Sorry, peaceniks, but context really is everything.

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  6. Context really is everything, which is why throwing out random scriptural citations doesn't prove anything but that you can use a concordance.

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  7. Hey you guys! - the Masonic forces in Mexico were attempting to destroy the Catholic Church and Mexican culture - they killed numerous priests nuns and faithful - it was like the Civil War in Spain. Self-defense is not a crime, nor is it prohibited by Catholic teaching. My goodness!

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  8. The history is a little more nuanced than that Terry, especially concerning the Cristeros.

    Remember Los Maestros Desorejados.

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  9. I'll do more homework.

    Where's Pablo on this one?

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  10. I'm sure he'll be by later.

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  11. I'm not saying, and please don't misinterpret, that there were no martyrs- there were. But it's not a black and white government bad/Cristeros good scenario.

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  12. Remember Los Maestros Desorejados.

    Which was about 10 years after the Cristero War. Different circumstances. The martyrs - like St Miguel Pro and Bd Jose - were murdered by the government merely for being Catholic, with the pretext of being in rebellion. I'm looking forward to the movie Cristiada that is coming out later this year.

    That's not to say the second wave of Cristeros were blameless in the late 1930's. Not in the least - and I would be surprised if the Church didn't universally condemn their actions against the Mexican teachers.

    But there is no comparison between the two. The way I see it, in the 20's, the Catholics were the persecuted. In the 30's, they were the persecutors.

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  13. Thom; Why are you so cranky?

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  14. How am I cranky, and how can you contribute to the conversation?

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  15. I rest my case, lol.

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  16. Shouldn't you be making sammiches for Pablo?

    See? I have a fantastic sense of humor.

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  17. Well done, Thom ;) Is Pablo hungry?

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  18. It's a woman's job to anticipate when her man will be hungry, not wait until he is. Chop chop!

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  19. I'd like chopped liver and swiss on rye. Hold the mayo, extra pickle. LOL!

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  20. Right you are, Thom! LOL Larry. Will you be having dessert?

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  21. Will you be having dessert?

    No thanks. I'm dieting.

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  22. Pablo is away from home fighting in Kentucky...

    The Cristero War is no longer confined to Mexico.

    The Padre I am traveling with is a great Padre.

    Pray for him and all Priests and the Holy Father.

    Hasta la vista.

    Viva Cristo Rey!

    *

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  23. Larry--Do please let me know if there is anything I can get you or some other way in which I might make you more comfortable!

    The Cristero War is no longer confined to Mexico

    LOL. You got that right, Migeul. I know your name is Pablo, but I started calling you Miguel and so can't stop.

    Pray and FAST for priests.

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  24. Larry--Do please let me know if there is anything I can get you or some other way in which I might make you more comfortable!

    How sweet of you! Maybe you could give my wife some tips.

    Just kidding!!!!!!!

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  25. Yikes!! Look what I stepped into...

    Ice cold Corona anyone??

    Thom--that sounds like something my dad would say...until he retired ahead of my mom and found out that he had to learn how to make his own lunch and snacks.. :)

    Sara

    PS the summer avatar is now up...snowmobile put away.

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  26. +JMJ+

    Dear Terry,

    The others are absolutely right. It's an offensive, demeaning, hateful, Satanic photograph.

    I wish someone in the Church would "fix" it with the same technology Steven Spielberg used to change all the guns in E.T. into walkie-talkies, to make it more child friendly. Because, as we all know, Christ was child friendly, too.

    But watch out! A few weeks ago, E.T. came on TV and I ranted to my younger brothers (born in the 90s, poor things) about Spielberg's attempt to repaint the past. Well, that cable channel happened to have an "old" digital copy of the movie, because all the guns were still there! And then my brothers thought I was making things up and demanded I change the channel so they could watch Glee--which is the most child-friendly show on TV these days. Seriously. I mean, have you ever seen a gun on Glee? Ever? I rest my case.

    Sincerely,

    Enbrethiliel


    (Filed under: #thecommenterisalwaysright)

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  27. Thom,

    'Prince of Peace' is a title for Our Lord taken from Isaias. What it means is quite clear in the context, which I gave. It doesn't mean that Christ is a pacifist, nor that He would have supported the Communists in Mexico. He did not promise peace on earth to all men, but to men of good will. Michael does not have a point. He has a snide and sarcastic remark, which is not the same thing.

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  28. Interesting exchange. I appreciate the perspective of Dr. David Rankin, who maintains that a all efforts to align Jesus with soldiers, marching, battles, banners, and wars (as, for example, in hymns like “Onward Christian Soldiers”) are part of a widespread fraud – “a pious, well-intentioned fraud,” says Rankin, “but a fraud nonetheless. For Jesus was a sissy.”

    If you're interested in reading what exactly Rankin means by this, click here.

    Peace,

    Michael

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  29. Enbrethiliel - your comment changed my entire opinion on the little Cristero now. ;)

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  30. For Jesus was a sissy.

    And that turning over the tables in the temple episode was where he got in touch with his masculine side.

    Oh! Oh! And that whole fasting in the desert for 40 days thing - he did that in order to suppress his masculinity.

    And where he called the Pharisees all sorts of nasty names - heck, he was just being b*tchy, I suppose.

    It all makes sense now...

    [eyeroll]

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  31. "...I change the channel so they could watch Glee--which is the most child-friendly show on TV these days. Seriously. I mean, have you ever seen a gun on Glee? Ever? I rest my case..."

    Satan disguises his murder of children and their souls.

    The children on "Glee" are queer, and fornicators; this pabulum of diabolical is palatable to people because they, as those in Sodom and Gomorrah, are no longer offended by, and resist sin.

    It is a mortal sin for Catholics to watch the filth on these types of shows.

    Catholics that use these filth programs have lost the Faith.

    In the first battle of the Cristero Rebellion, the Mexicans only had sticks and stones, while the Freemason Government Troops were well supplied.

    They prayed to the Holy Mother, and she gave them the victory.

    The uniforms and artillery you see in the picture were supplied to Government Troops by American Freemasons in the battle to murder Catholic Priests and topple Holy Mother Church in Mexico.

    During the San Patricio movement, when the American Freemason Military captured the Irish, the torture of them for having supported Holy Mother Church is still talked about today as the most brutal torture of anyone anywhere on this planet.

    The Devil runs Hell; he knows how to torture.

    You do not go against his children the Freemasons with a feather.

    Sometimes guns and swords are needed.

    I am amazed some people fall for the warm and fuzzy facade Satan hides his murder behind.

    When someone commits a homosexual act, all the Angels in Heaven cry out for revenge.

    I would like to know what you liberals and gays think the reason is for them doing so?

    Is it out of "Glee" for the act?

    *

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  32. St. Michael - Enbrethiliel was just being sarcastic.

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  33. But thank you St. Michael for shedding light on the Cristeros.

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  34. Mr. Nelson,

    May people are actually learning the Faith through your site...

    They keep quiet, but they are picking up much to fortify themselves with when they do step up to the plate and fully embrace the Faith.

    At Tepeyac Hill on December 12th last year, a Priest called out from the pulpit for Mexicans to start re-learning the Faith through things like your blog.

    Too bad we don't have one like it for them yet.

    God be with you, and fear not, our Mother has you in the fold of her mantle.

    Some art work about this sometime?

    Viva Cristo Rey!

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  35. Mr. Nelson,

    Recently, a Cristero Priest was murdered at the Basilica of Nuestra Senora Santa Maria de Guadalupe in Mexico City.

    He was in an apartment at the Basilica that is used only for Priests at the Basilica. He was beaten to death after taking action through the Vatican in regard to the Freemasons infiltrated into positions of authority in the Church where the Virgin Mary appeared to Saint Juan Diego.

    The Cristero Rebellion is not over.

    I plan on sending to the Vatican a request for a formal Charter for us.

    We’ve never needed one, but it would be nice to have it.

    My Cristero brothers keep telling me “Charter? We don’ need no stinkin’ Charter!”

    But it would be nice.

    *

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  36. St. Michael - I definitely will be painting Jose Luis - but I want to paint St. Toribio Roma first - we have a large Latino population up here, as well as many immigrants. They are so good and honorable and very hard working.

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  37. I'm off to adoration - will pray for your intentions.

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  38. I think you should paint Fr. Jose Reyes Vega.

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  39. Sorry, LarryD, but your response seems to confirm Rankin's contention that there's something about the word ‘sissy’ that can threaten our egos!

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  40. Michael B - not at all. I just happen to think that such a depiction of our Lord and Savior is blasphemous and deserves ridicule and scorn.

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  41. How are defining "sissy"? However it is, it doesn't seem to square with what Rankin is on about.

    Also, why isn't an image of Jesus (or images of his followers) as a warrior or soldier "blasphemous" and deserving of "ridicule and scorn"?

    It seems pretty obvious from the gospel accounts of his words and deeds that Jesus was much more a "sissy" (as understood by Rankin) that a hyper-macho warrior figure.

    Peace,

    Michael

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  42. Michael - you and Rankin are playing with 20th-21st century male stereotypes attempting to define, confine the sacred humanity of Christ within these parameters. You know better than that. You also know that effeminancy is a vice and could not have been part of Christ's perfect nature - human or divine. You are much smarter than that - to play such games.

    Prayers my friend,

    Terry

    I'm going offline now, so hold that thought if you can. ;)

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  43. A lot of Christ's followers down the ages have been soldiers. Why does Michael think they should be ridiculed and scorned? Did Jesus ridicule and scorn the Centurion? I don't think so. (Luke 7:8-9)

    Was "St Michael" here referring to the murder of Father Julio Cesar Mendoza Acuna in 2008?

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  44. Oh, I don't think I'm the one playing with stereotypes!

    Peace,

    Michael

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  45. Michael - you should read Benedict XVI's two books, Jesus of Nazareth. There you will get a broader, more up to date Christology - it's amazing to read - although it is ever so dense.

    God bless you.

    Terry

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  46. Michael - here's a quote of Rankin's lifted from your link:

    A man was so physically frail that he could not even carry a wooden cross to the top of a hill. A man who suffered a humiliating defeat while blessing the enemies who had arranged his death. A sissy. One of the greatest models in religious history was an honest-to-God, real live, long-haired, soft-bodied sissy.

    'Physically frail'? Let's see - beaten, scourged, kicked, half-starved...more like physically destroyed than frail. No one could have carried his cross up Calvary in that condition.

    'One of the greatest models'? Jesus Christ is the 2nd person of the Trinity, not merely a great model of religious history. Though I suppose it makes Jesus more approachable thinking him as some long-haired maggot-infested Kumbaya dude who won't demand anything from you, because, you know, he's a sissy and all...but be real. Jesus' love demands we sacrifice all, to stay on the narrow road, to bear our crosses manfully - not sissily - that we repent of our sins and love our enemies and...well, I think you get the idea.

    Forgiving one's enemies is not the sign of a sissy - it's the sign of strength. It is a very masculine thing to do.

    Rankin wishes Jesus only as a soft lovable fuzzball, without all that icky stuff of cutting of one's hand or gouging out one's eye or picking up one's cross or pruning off dead branches or withering the fig tree. Cos, you know, that stuff is violent, hard and demanding.

    To stereotype Jesus as a sissy as defined in 20th/21st century terms is silly. He is not effeminate, cowardly or timid - perhaps the world sees Him that way because it lacks the grace to see, but he ought not be perceived as such by His followers. He stands before us in spiritual battle; He has defeated death; He has conquered sin. He's not victorious because He was a sissy - it's because He's the Son of God.

    And if I'm going to engage in spiritual combat, if I'm going to wrestle against the flesh, if I'm going to battle the sins in my life, I believe it's much better to follow a man of love, strength and fearlessness than a sissy.

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  47. Also, why isn't an image of Jesus (or images of his followers) as a warrior or soldier "blasphemous" and deserving of "ridicule and scorn"?


    I've never seen an image of Christ as a warrior. But His followers have often been depicted as soldiers or warriors because we are engaged in spiritual battle - against the world, the flesh and the devil. St Paul used soldier-imagery in how we are to arm ourselves, for instance. We are exhorted to 'fight the good fight'.

    And some are called to fight in self-defense, or for justice's sake, to defend the weak or oppressed. As Christ said, a man has no greater love than to lay down his life for another.

    Calling Christ a sissy is reducing Him to a one-dimensional plastic caricature.

    Those who love with all their heart - as Christ did, with every drop of His blood - are not sissies. It takes great strength to love as He loves, as we are called to love as well.

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  48. It also takes strength to be vulnerable, tender, compassionate and forgiving -- qualities that our society dismiss as belonging to sissies (if you're a man that is), yet qualities Jesus embodied in abundance. That's the whole point of Rankin's article, and why he can say "Jesus is a sissy." I'm amazed that you missed that.

    Oh, and how do you reconcile your last comment with Jesus' words: "He who lives by the sword, dies by the sword"? Not to mention his declaration "Blessed are the peacemakers"?

    In conclusion, I resonate with John Deer's understanding of Jesus:

    "I consider Jesus’ whole life and discover there, in the cumulative effect, an entirely new way of life, something rarely seen, something rarely invoked in the mass media and the churches – the most perfect life of love, compassion, nonviolence, peacemaking and resistance to injustice and empire.

    I see Jesus as a nonviolent revolutionary who sets in motion God’s peace movement for the disarmament of every heart, every nation and every age. His nonviolent revolution continues to this day and, as participants in it, we celebrate his birth and his revolutionary life."

    Peace,

    Michael

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  49. Mike from Texas7:10 PM

    Pray for us Saint Jose!!! Ask the Lord Jesus to us His Spirit and your faith! Thank you for your help!

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