See how the farmer waits for the precious fruit of the earth, being patient with it until it receives the early and the late rains. - James 5:7

Sunday, May 08, 2011

More Mass Chat.



Anyway.
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After Mass I meekly stood my distance from the priest as he greeted the people leaving church, waiting patiently to ask him what he thought about the bin Laden deal.  I especially wanted to ask him since he is a former military chaplain. So he called to me, "Terry, What up?"  I went over to him and said, "I just have to ask what you thought about the bin Laden deal."
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"I rejoiced!  But of course I felt bad that a human being was killed."  he said beaming.
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"Me too!"  I said beaming.
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I love that priest.
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Ordinary people.
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There is something to be said about the greatness of ordinariness.  I find it interesting that the best of the best priests in this archdiocese celebrate Mass according to the Ordinary Form.  The bishops in Minnesota do likewise.  I never hear them speak against the new revised translation for the Mass, nor against the Extraordinary Form of Mass. 
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I think some readers think I dis the EF, but I'm not about doing that at all.  I was trained as an altar boy for the traditional Mass.  Nevertheless, when reading various websites one can get the impression that the Ordinary Form of Mass is less holy than the EF Mass, and as one guy once told me, "If you know the beauty and splendor of the EF Mass and continue to attend the Novus Ordo - which is the Ordinary Form, you may be endangering your immortal soul."  That's bull shit. 
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The miracle at Emmaus.
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In today's Gospel, the Risen Christ showed himself as an ordinary man as he walked along with the disciples - and they did not recognize him until the 'breaking of the bread'.  Ordinary people recognize Christ in the breaking of the bread - in the Eucharist, the Mass - no matter if it is the EF or OF, it is the Mass wherein the Eucharist is confected and Christ is amongst us.
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Liturgical abuse is a separate matter of course, and I am not talking that kind of stuff here.
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Mother's Day
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I thought about my mother and her 'happy death' and realized that when I finally see her in heaven I won't recognize her because she will actually be happy and kind and pure and radiantly on fire in charity and love - that is, in that light and glory that is God.  (When my mother finally died, I was very happy for her.  Rejoicing over some one's death is not always bad.)
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Happy Mother's day to all moms, but especially those with mental illness, addiction and other sufferings that may impair and distort their ability to love their children.

22 comments:

  1. Perhaps next time you see your priest you could share with him the following from Pax Christi USA.

    ". . . The killing of bin Laden becomes one more waypoint in a quest for vengeance that will, as all acts of violence do, lead to ever more violence and death. The cycle must be broken. To do so will take much courage and sustained effort. Our prayers for the victims, both of bin Laden’s violence and our militarized response, must give way to true repentance —- a turning away from violence as a path to national redemption. . . . Our struggle is to be worthy of the label 'Christian' and as such compels us to reject violence and hatred, to eschew celebrations of violent 'victories' and to deepen our commitment to 'love our enemies' and build a world based on solidarity and the common good. In their statement on the death of Osama bin Laden, the Vatican reaffirms this call: 'In the face of a man’s death, a Christian never rejoices, but reflects on the serious responsibilities of each person before God and before men, and hopes and works so that every event may be the occasion for the further growth of peace and not of hatred.'"

    The full statement can be read here.

    Peace,

    Michael

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  2. Good post, Terry.
    May your mom, and all of our moms who have passed on, enjoy the peace and happiness of heaven. Your mom and mine had in common that they both suffered and died from cancer. I'm praying that they someday find a cure which doesn't involve cutting, poisoning, or irradiating, the victims.

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  3. As I stated on an earlier post Osama needed killing. I am not celebrating but I am glad he's gone.

    Our priest spoke to the issue and it was a comfort.

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  4. Thanks Michael, I will do that.

    Melody - where/how have you been? Long time no see. God bless you!

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  5. One young boy this morning at Mass had the perfect response concerning bin Laden..

    "Ding dong the Witch is dead!!"

    He is young enough that he has not known a world without the poison that monster cast..and even this little boy is glad.

    Sara

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  6. "I rejoiced! But of course I felt bad that a human being was killed." he said beaming.

    "Me too!" I said beaming.

    I love that priest.

    I love that priest too!

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  7. Hi, Terry! I sorta took Lent off from reading blogs; the idea was to spend that time praying. I wish I could say that actually happened; but I just found other ways to waste time (not that your blog is a waste of time!)

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  8. Yes, the Holy Sacrifice is beyond any "Forma".
    Thanks, Mr. Terry.
    And bless ALL mothers...I have a sister who is a single mom, in some horrible circumstances...I understand.
    As for Usama...I understand he was an enemy of truth, justice and love.
    I grieve for his death, however.
    Jesus transformed the "love of neighbor" to ones' enemies.
    As hard as that is.

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  9. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  10. The Mass is a reality beyond Rite.
    There may be questionable aspects of the Ordinary Form...God will take care of it.
    But when a validly ordained priest offers Mass according to the norms of the Latin Rite (in either Forma), the Sacrifice of the Cross is mystically re-presented.
    Otherwise, how could we have a multiplicity of Rites (Eastern and even in the West, the Milanese(Ambrosian) and Mozarabic?

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  11. Anonymous7:43 PM

    Terry, your last thought about Moms resonated with me. My late Mom was an alcoholic who never admitted her condition - and to this day, almost 21 yrs. after her death, no one in the family has admitted to it either. Consequently, there were many difficult moments during my childhood and young womanhood, and when my kids were born I made a promise that w/ God's help they would never see me under the influence. So far, by the grace of God, I've been able to keep that promise, and our two sons (both in their 20s) have turned out to be fine young men. Today, I thought of Mom and all the sufferings she endured in her life, and prayed that she's found the peace that so eluded her on earth. (BTW, "St. Michael Come to Our Defense," do you wake up each morning determined to be as unpleasant and provocative as possible, or do you just have a nasty tongue? In this joyful Easter season, can you not just lay off even for one day? Really - you should get out more! Praying for you,

    and thanks again Terry,
    Chloesmom

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  12. Chloesmom - I'm glad you related to what I had to say about my mom. Happy Mother's Day!

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  13. "... (BTW, "St. Michael Come to Our Defense," do you wake up each morning determined to be as unpleasant and provocative as possible, or do you just have a nasty tongue? In this joyful Easter season, can you not just lay off even for one day? Really - you should get out more! Praying for you,..."

    Madam, please do not pray for me in that manner.

    How can you say I have a nasty tongue when I come to the defense of mommies?

    I am very active in many areas, Madam.

    I am not a warm and fuzzy Roman Protestant.

    I also am not so rigid I cannot encourage those with me to charity and love for that which our Lord wants for our happiness.

    I consider this blog of Mr. Nelson to be a blog that reaches many souls; some it edifies, some seethe at the love for Christ shown amongst its commenter's.

    I don't mean to speak to those with charity.

    I mean to speak to those others, such as yourself, to encourage them to know, love, and serve God, in the manner of His will.

    Mr. Nelson probably doesn't 'get out' much, but he sure covers a lot of ground on his blog.

    I think keeping him away from the Vatican blog meeting was part of a conspiracy.

    *

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  14. Anonymous8:55 PM

    I am not a warm and fuzzy Protestant either, Michael - several people in my parish can attest to that! Each day I thank God for my Catholic faith, and strive to love God and my neighbour as Christ did - I have come to realize that venom is not the answer, prayer is - after all, Christ told us to pray for those who persecute us, and love our enemies. You are not an enemy, Michael, but I get the sense that you're a very unhappy person who needs to experience more of the true love of Christ in your life. It is understandable, given so much of the nonsense that goes on in our parishes, to become very frustrated and angy -- been there, done that! However, having gone through a period of my life where my anger and hostility affected my family and drove me into isolation, I realized through prayer that the only answer was more prayer, namely the Holy Rosary, which I pray daily, and will continue to pray. Through the example of Mary I'm learning the value of silence and service, and will continue to intercede with her for you. God bless you.

    Chloesmom

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  15. "...to become very frustrated and angy -- been there, done that!..."

    I apologize for not stating more clearly that I am not a woman, Madam.

    I do not become frustrated and angry.

    I am a Cristero Roman Catholic Mexican, Madam, a son of Nuestra Senora Santa Maria de Guadalupe.

    Our Mother keeps us in the fold of her mantle and provides as a good mommy does, all that we need.

    At Fatima, Our Mother asked us to pray for the poor sinners.

    Please send your prayers to these, that are more worthy of your prayers than I.

    *

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  16. Dear Nazareth Priest,

    You are comparing apples and oranges hoping oil and water will mix.

    You crack me up.

    If you weren't a Padre I would ask what's the name of that world you live in? And can I get there by Amtrak?

    My humble prayers are for you, Padre, at least some are yours.

    God be with you.

    pablo

    *

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  17. Pere Marie-Eugene (1894-1967) founded just before WW2 the Carmelite Secular Institute, Notre-Dame de Vie, for young women wishing to live in the world the vows of poverty, chastity, and obedience, the principal lines of a program of perfection in conformity to the spirit of Carmel - "The great proof of holiness is not to not have temptations or weariness, but to always go on, to react, to climb towards God."

    http://floscarmelivitisflorigera.blogspot.com/2009/08/pere-marie-eugene-of-child-jesus-ocd.html

    Miss Maria,

    I really have enjoyed reading about this Padre.

    I hope you like the above site.

    *

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  18. Me too, Pablo. We climb higher, right? Thanks.

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  19. Anonymous1:17 AM

    Terry, I read your blog quite a bit and I understand each person has his preference for either the Novus Ordo or Traditional Latin Mass. I have my preference (the latter) yet I respect you and others who favor the Novus Ordo. We may be ordinary people, but we recognize Christ in the Holy Sacrifice at the altar. That is extraordinary, and it transcends Tridentine or Novus Ordo. For me it is more a question of merit. I am not trying to be rude or persuasive, but you may enjoy reading this artice on this very topic:

    http://syriancatholic.blogspot.com/2010/03/latin-mass-is-more-meritorious-and.html

    It is long, but worth reading if you have time.

    Andrew

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  20. Dear Terry,

    I have come to enjoy reading your blog on a daily basis.

    Thopas

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  21. Thopas - thanks very much.

    Andrew - Thanks for your kind comments. If my parish had the traditional (EF) Mass, I would be equally as happy as I am with the Novus Ordo. Perhaps the following example explains my attitude better:

    In my practice of adoration of the Blessed Sacrament it makes no difference to me if the Host is exposed in a monstrance with many candles, or hidden in the tabernacle with only the sanctuary lamp.

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