Thursday, December 09, 2010

Professional Catholics... Yes!


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Okay!  Michael Voris nails it here.

51 comments:

  1. Just like any job or vocation there is the "Peter Principle"...same hold true inthe church...

    OTOH...many of us have other careers, families, obligations...we CAN'T donate 100 percent of our time to the Church. That's why we HIRE people..secretaries, janitors, gardners, handymen, teachers, clergy...

    There's also quite a bit of apathy...try getting ANYONE to be usher, lector, EM, choir, musicians, wash altar linens, serve coffee after Mass, be on funeral committee, Scouts, etc...people don't want to get involved..of course when I was a Protestant people were SHAMED from the pulpit to do these things...don't see so much of that in the Catholic Church..

    Sara

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  2. This is the second time in 2 days that I have said this in comments on your blog, but there is nothing new under the sun.

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  3. Terry

    I disagree. He is using words like "liberals" improperly. Using key words just to appease his masses without any real content.

    Second, is that the full quote, or what is missing with the "...."? I don't know. It seems like something is missing.

    Third, thus one would have to wonder what bureaucracy the Pope is talking about. What's the greater context of the quote? This leads me to think he is proof-texting the Pope, ignoring context, and misrepresenting the Pope to make him sound like "The Pope is saying what I am saying." No, the Pope is not.

    Fourth, leading to why the desert fathers keep reminding us not to do such commentaries and judgments on others while we ignore the impact of words on ourselves. Sorry, but I see Michael Voris a "professional Catholic" who "makes a living on their Catholicism" (as with many other popular apologists) who really offer "a few scattered drops." Why? Because Voris constantly ignores much of the Catholic tradition and really conflates his American political view with Catholic orthodoxy. He will criticize officials based upon his political views, ignoring however how the officials are one with the Vatican's own position. His ignores or abuse of Church teaching is very telling. Indeed, this is the problem and issue: lack of humility and a triumphalism for one's ego. Then one thinks all that is critical is about "the other" and never "myself."

    This goes with St Ammonas:

    "Third, if someone judges a person who is sinning, he too is judged, even if he should perform signs and wonders. For Christ says, 'Do not judge and you will not be judged.' For a Christian sould not judge people, 'for neither does the Father judge anyone, but has given all judgment to the Son.' So, anyone who judging before Christ is an anti-christ. Many who today are robbers and fornicators, tomorrow become holy and just, and while we knew their sins, we did not perceive their hidden virtues, and we judged unfairly."

    Now one can say "are you not judging judges" by saying things like I said above. No, because I am not going to the state of his soul, and acting like I am a prophet speaking for God. I am not. I am just another sinner who strives for grace.

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  4. Michael Voris is another soul who is raising an army of martrys for the days we are living in. The man is on fire!

    If you haven't seen the one he did for our Catholic men leading a charge to be courageous, it is a must see. I'll post the link when I'm not on my PDA.
    Parents whose children have been indoctrinated with the tripe of malcontents who don't want their errors judged are THRILLED that God has filled this man with the Holy Spirit. He is a witness and a daily must watch for men who want to live out their Baptismal call to rise up to lead the confused back to the truth.

    Now, now Henry, what a terrible thing to say about the Pope! He has just warned his people that there are faithless Catholics who will mislead and confuse them and we had best indeed make judgments about them.

    BTW, if you preach there are no judgments to be made (which conflates with Catholic teaching and Christ's warning to 'test everything' because there will be false shepherds, by what authority do you call people liars, slanderes, detractors, or make judgment that Michael is not fulfilling his role given to him by the Holy Spirit?

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  5. Here's the must see vortex for men called to a prophetic role in the Church.


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qaKL2PpehBM&feature=player_embedded

    btw - many thanks to the contemplatives whose prayers and offerings give the Church's prophets strength and cover their backs. This is delicious fruit of those prayers!

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  6. First, I did not say anything against the Pope. I mentioned, however, how the words being used by Voris seemed to be out of place and oddly used. I am proven correct if one looks at the words in context -- Voris is joining things together which are not together in the text itself. Here, for example, is the context for a part of what the Pope said:

    "We on the continent of Europe are [not experiencing] the great dynamic of a new beginning that is really present elsewhere and which I encounter again and again on my journeys and through the visits of the bishops … Less clearly but nevertheless unmistakably, we find here in the West, too, a revival of new Catholic initiatives that are not ordered by a structure or a bureaucracy. The bureaucracy is spent and tired. These initiatives come from within, from the joy of young people. Christianity is perhaps acquiring another face and, also, another cultural form … I am quite optimistic that Christianity is on the verge of a new dynamic."

    This is quite different from the way Voris uses the text without context. This shows Voris is using the text for pretext, without doing proper exegetical work. There is much which needs to be done to get meaning out of these words: of course one could always presume "I am great, I am on the right side always, and so anyone who I believe is wrong is being spoken by these words." But that is poor exegetics. What the Pope seems to be pointing out is that there is some good going on with the way the Spirit is leading people, to realize it is not just clericalism that guides the Church. The Church needs this constant freshness of faith -- the institution holds it up, and it is through the Spirit which makes the institution alive. This is not saying, for example, "The USCCB are liberals promoting things like environmentalism and this is bad." The Pope himself is an environmentalist and many of the things Voris criticizes the clergy for are positions which they share with the Pope.

    There is need for humility. This is what is lacking in so much conversation on the net, especially with the blogosphere magisterium. People without humility, pushing political agendas and running their mouths against the fullness of Catholic teaching. People going around, becoming "professional Catholics" making money through imperfect and failed presentations of Catholic teaching, such as Catholic Social Doctrine, are among those the Pope criticized. This is not a judgment of their souls, which of course, is what I said - stop the equivocation; I would recommend you read what I said about judgment. We need to judge ourselves, condemn ourselves, plead for ourselves -- and stop looking at others to point to as an excuse to ignore our own spiritual warfare.

    Abby Anthony predicted that this Abba Ammonas would make progress in the fear of God. He led him outside his cell, and showing him a stone, said to him, "Hurt this stone, beat it." He did so. Then Anthony asked him, "Has the stone said anything?" He replied, "No." Then Anthony said, "You too will be able to do that," and that is what happened. Abba Ammonas advanced to the point where his goodness was so great, he took no notice of wickedness. Thus, having become bishop, someone brought a young girl who was pregnant to him, saying, "See what this unhappy wretch has done; give her a penance." But he, having marked the girl's womb with the sign of the cross, commanded that six pairs of fine linen sheets should be given her, saying, "It is for fear that, when she comes to give birth, she may die, she or the child, and have nothing for the burial." So her accusers resumed, "Why did you do that? Give her a punishment." But he said to them, "Look, brothers, she is near to death, what am I to do?" Then he sent her away and no old man dared accuse anyone any more.

    Look what goodness brings.

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  7. michael r.7:45 AM

    "Fourth, leading to why the desert fathers keep reminding us not to do such commentaries and judgments on others while we ignore the impact of words on ourselves. Sorry, but I see Michael Voris a "professional Catholic" who "makes a living on their Catholicism" (as with many other popular apologists) who really offer "a few scattered drops." Why? Because Voris constantly ignores much of the Catholic tradition and really conflates his American political view with Catholic orthodoxy. He will criticize officials based upon his political views, ignoring however how the officials are one with the Vatican's own position. His ignores or abuse of Church teaching is very telling. Indeed, this is the problem and issue: lack of humility and a triumphalism for one's ego. Then one thinks all that is critical is about "the other" and never "myself." "

    You nailed it, Henry! These words could be spoken of many of us in the Catholic blogosphere.

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  8. I don't like Michael Voris, and I agree with him most of the time. I think he lacks any sense of humility, and I think he misunderstands the fullness of Catholic teaching. There IS room for legitimate differences of opinion (not on issued defined by the Magisterium, mind you) and spiritual practice and discipline. Period. Anyone who denies that is an historical illiterate and is more worried about "being right" than being good.

    Voris is not "on fire with the Holy Spirit" - he seems to be puffed up with pride. This is the whole damn problem with the Blogisterium - we can take potshots at anyone, anytime, without knowing the whole story and without being fully conversant in the topic at hand. The Catholic Church is not the American media, and the values of that media are not Christian values. For one thing, detraction is a serious sin.

    He reminds me of one of those who excommunicated the Orthodox in 1054 (to the pope's dismay, and to our detriment - but it was better to be triumphalist than to actually try to heal the rift), or the Dominicans who got the Jesuits suppressed, or to those who attacked Aquinas for his "novelty", or to the SSPX idiots who try to force the Tridentine Mass on Ukrainian Catholics (whose rite is much, much older).

    And the guy LOVES conspiracy theories involving Jews. Isn't he also one of those that claims Heliocentrism is a heresy (or am I thinking of the wrong video)?

    Point is, Voris is dangerous, because even though he says a LOT of good things, maybe 90% of the time, he lacks humility, and he lacks the ability to distinguish between dissent and legitimate differences.

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  9. Mercury

    So many do not know the story of St Thomas, it is amazing. I'm no Thomist (I'm too Eastern), but I respect what he tried to do and understand him better than many of his so-called supporters. And of course, I agree with quite a bit of his views, even if I don't always agree with how he got there.

    I've had many people complain about how I engage Muslims (or Buddhists, or Hindus, or Native Americans, or many others) and then tell me "look to St Thomas Aquinas, see what he says." Funny that.

    Sort of also reminds me of how many people quoted Vladimir Solovyov from his "Three Conversations" when he discussed the Anti-Christ. They really didn't get Solovyov at all, and used it to reject many good things because "the Anti-Christ will like them: see Solovyov." Of course, if they knew Solovyov, they would know how far off they are from him. More importantly, his AntiChrist was made in the image of Tolstoy -- because the dialogue was against Tolstoy. While I respect much of the heart behind Tolstoy's views, Solovyov is right in condemning the excess they became in Tolstoy. The issue is not, however, "these are evils." Rather, "this is how good can be perverted."

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  10. Belinda, You've got that right! I think Michael is very equipped and there are many of us who have been waiting a decade or two for him to come along who have his back in prayer.

    Henry, you overthink things and make them more complicated than they are.

    You realize that the Pope listened and read people claiming they are Catholics teaching Catholic teaching made a judgment they are in error?

    Do you have a problem with his making a judgment about that error or don't you?

    According to teaching and rational thinking, it's our duty to check out what people say against what the Church teaches and then make a judgment on it. If somebody is misleading people, it's the role of a prophet who has been called by the Holy Spirit to that role, to warn the people about the errors. There are many who are uncatechized and who can and are being led astray.

    This is the reason why the Pope spoke out - to warn his flock.

    So, while the Pope is calling people to make judgments, and there are those carrying out the prophetic role given to them by the Holy Spirit, you are calling people not to make judgments while making judgments about people who are carrying out their roles inspired by the Pope and the Holy Spirit.


    If you are in conflict with what Michael is doing, you are in conflict with what the Pope did and what the Pope is advising the rest of us to do.

    See what I'm getting at?

    What Michael is doing is not making a judgment upon people's souls, he is making a judgment about the errors being made. It is the same exact process the Pope just went through. See one. Do one. Teach one.

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  11. I agree that Voris is problematic and serves as a polarizing influence in the church. I say this as someone who generally leans in the direction of agreeing with what he says.

    But how he says it leaves much to be desired.

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  12. Thanks Henry and Mercury - I was agreeing with Michael's take on the professionals in chanceries and parishes - real small time stuff. I liked how he stated that and found a reference for it in B-16's book. Perhaps it was taken out of context, but the quote resonated with my own experience.

    Generally I like Voris - I think his style is even entertaining at times - although it might be his broadcast training - and I wonder if he doesn't intend it to be tongue in cheek. I have to admit, I agree with a lot of what he says, I also realize he fires people up or pushes the right buttons to get an argument started. I have the same faults on this blog - without pretending to be an authority of course. Unpolished rhetoric pierces the net, as it were. Unfortunately, we often make mistakes and therefore we need to be discerning. (Just the other day I mixed up my Bishops in a post. Bad.)

    Strangely enough, I thought of Michael in reference to today's Gospel this morning - when speaking of John the Baptist Christ says the kingdom of God suffers violence and the violent take it by force. So, even though Michael doesn't have all the high degrees and polish of a Cardinal or a doctor of theology - he speaks clearly, candidly, and frankly, and is able to arouse normal Catholics from their apathy. I also thinks he does his research - albeit he is not infallible. Sometimes souls tend more towards the example of John the Baptist in the desert than the sayings of the desert fathers.

    I also like his hair. ;)

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  13. Carol

    You continue with assumptions which are false: Michael Voris is doing what the Pope wants and so if you criticize Michael Voris, you criticize the Pope. This has been shown to be false by how Michael Voris himself distorted the Pope's words, taken them out of context, and used them to do what the Pope criticized "professional Catholics" do.

    I'm answered the point on judgment.

    A brother at Scetis committed a fault. A council was called to which Abba Moses was invited, but he refused to go to it. Then the priest sent someone to say to him, "Come, for everyone is waiting or you." So he got up and went. He took a leaking jug, filled it with water and carried it with him. The others came out to meet him and said to him, "What is this, Father?" The old man said to them, "My sins run out behind me, and I do not see them, and today I am coming to judge the errors of another." When they heard that they said no more to the brother but forgave him.

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  14. Oh - BTW - at the grocery store yesterday I picked up a copy of Sarah Palin's book. I read excerpts here and there throughout - I almost threw the book back on the shelf, like it was burning hot to the touch! I found myself agreeing with stuff she was writing.

    OMIGOSH! What am I turning into?! LOL!

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  15. Terry

    The problem is that Michael is taking two texts which are not joined together and acting like they go together and using them for his own point, while ignoring his own place as a "professional Catholic." It's easy to judge people who work for the Church -- especially if they act in a pastoral way. It's far greater when we must continue to reflect on how words are meant for us, not the others. That is the problem: taking these quotes out of context, they are ignoring what Pope Benedict is actually saying, which is far wider, and far more important. Look to the quote in context as I provided it: quite a quote: think of St Francis of Assisi and the criticism Francis had in his time. What was Francis' response to the criticism? To tell his friars to support the priests, especially those who have gossip around them. If we can understand this lesson of Francis, I think we can better understand what Pope Benedict sees -- and sees as a good thing. Beyond that, look how he talks about a need for a new culture. That is a wide-ranging statement. That is exactly what is needed, though.

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  16. "far more important" not "far greater"

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  17. Mercury,

    Lots of folks didn't like John the Baptist. They too accused him of a lack of humility.

    Nobody likes the prophet. That's why people have not been taking the role on. They didn't have the kind of love it takes for Christ to set aside the erroneous judgments that come from the people when you have to carry out the role.

    We waited far too long worrying about the character assassinations and malice of people who don't want to see the zeal Michael has for the House of the Lord because their fire is low or hear that what they teach is in error.

    Many confuse what they see as a lack of humility but is zealous servitude to Our Lord and nobody but Our Lord.

    Charlotte - the language Michael is using is actually the language one uses to raise prophets needed. It's a little like comparing Fr. Rutler to Fr. Eutenauer. They are two different things for two different reasons.

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  18. LOL.

    Sara Palin has a role in politics - she is raising political militants. She is very, very effective at it. That kind of a role isn't the same as running or being President - which belongs more to a Mike Huckabee or my hero Ronald Reagan. It all works together in politics.

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  19. Henry,

    I've spoken before about how teachings are congruent and the fact that you cannot see how they fit like pieces of a puzzle are leading you to false conclusions.

    Not much more I can say about it other than to keep pointing out where the flaws in your logic are coming from.

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  20. Henry - I always appreciate your point of view and understand your concerns over Voris - I recall an earlier post concerning him on Vox Nova. I welcome your insights. I agree with St. Francis and you that we need to support our priests - especially today when they are burdened with financial concerns and operation expenditures for their churches and schools. Thanks for the reminder.

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  21. Carol - glad you caught my humor in that one.

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  22. Whenever his thoughts urged him to pass judgment on something which he saw, he would say to himself: "Agathon, it is not your business to do that." Thus his spirit was always recollected.

    The same abba said, "A man who is angry, even if he were to raise the dead, is not acceptable to God.

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  23. One day Abba Isaac went to a monastery. He saw a brother committing a sin and condemned him. When he returned to the desert, an angel of the Lord came and stood in front of the door of his cell and said, "I will not let you enter." But he persisted saying, "What is the matter?" and the angel replied, "God has sent me to ask you where you want to throw the guilty brother whom you have condemned." Immediately, he repented and said, "I have sinned, forgive me." Then the angel said, "Get up, God has forgiven you. But from now on, be careful not to judge someone before God has done so."

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  24. Henry - your desert father quotes sparked a thought - about a Christian Brother abuse story - where the superiors did nothing - I think I'll post my thoughts in another entry. Too bad we all can't sit around and discuss this stuff! Thanks for the desert father's though - I love them.

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  25. Terry

    You are welcome to the quotes; of course I have many more I could offer. I know you understand full well my love for the desert fathers and why I love them. I look to them as a reminder of so many things. As I've said in all of this, I think we should always keep in mind our own sins first. It is always a temptation to look to others first, and the reason why should be obvious.

    As a side note, I just read the new book on St Ammonas last week, which is why he has been first and foremost in my thoughts. He was one of the chosen successors of St Anthony, my patron (another reason the saying connected to the two is important to me). The book is Useful Servanthood and interesting; the best part is the translation of all writings attributed to St Ammonas from the Greek we have of his works.

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  26. I wish I could see the church in 20 or so years. I think we will see a church strengthened by the Holy Spirit, infiltrated by the home schoolers and frosted with the blood of martyrs.

    And all the while left with a lot of aged and dead heritics by the way side and the win- win for us is that they didin't breed much. (Harsh but true) They lived by birth control and they will have died out by birth control.

    *****
    Brilliant or stupid, either way, I can only take so much arguing and complaining.

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  27. Carol - Michael Voris is nothing like John the Baptist, nor he is he a prophet - he's a (quite legitimately) angry guy with slick presentation and a big mouth. He speaks with no authority other than himself and his own opinions. I she orthodox? sure. Does he do his best to uphold Catholic orthodoxy? sure. But he has no room for anyone who may disagree with him about what exactly orthodoxy is. That would include the current and previous pope, as well as several saints.

    If he wants to raise his sword for Christ, if he wants to dig for dirt and expose people and run his own little Inquisition, let him. But I've seen way too much of traditionalists shutting out anyone who doesn't think EXACTLY like they do, and yet are themselves often wrong because they do not understand the fullness of Tradition and are totally lacking in basic charity.

    He also subscribes to some pretty crazy crap and then tells everyone this is the "only authentic" Catholic position. Watch his video on Jews, it's an eye-opener. I bet he owns a copy of "Rape of the Soul" too ( a joke, not an accusation).

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  28. Mercury,

    The "fullness of tradition" was ans is not open to most of the tripe fed to souls with license. Time to get teaching back to absolute truth. Confessionals were full wwhen absolute truth was taught with simplicity.

    Making judgements about errors is the most critical tool to keeping a soul in a state of grace. Henry is teaching making these judgements as sinful "in the fullness of tradition". It is thee antithesis of our faith.

    This phrase is also being used to keep apostates in their role teaching children or rapists in their role as priests or bishops who protect rapists who claim they don't know the warning signs elected to higher offices where children will then be in jeopardy because they have some other kindness or charity to provide to homeless people.

    These may be somebody's tradition, but it isn't Catholic.

    Gotta get back to basics.

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  29. But Michael Voris often makes judgments in areas that are open for debate, and pretends like his opinion is the fullness of tradition when it's not. He also reports dirt on people with all the charitable prudence of the National Enquirer.

    Michael Voris may be right on many many things, but he totally loses ALL of my respect when he makes his viewpoint the sine qua non of tradition, and when he jumps on people without sufficient reflection or evaluation of what was ACTUALLY said or ACTUALLY believed by the person who may have misspoke.

    His behavior is all too often NOT Christian, not matter how much truth he speaks.

    He's not a saintly defender of Truth but a smug and pretentious traditionalist who delights in "crushing heretics" and fancies himself a modern day St. Jerome.

    I do not deny that most of what he says is right, and that we need people to speak truth to power. But what we don't need is guys on video-blogs spouting off their one-man-magisterial opinions and executing their judgments on other people's intentions.

    Voris will attack anyone and everyone. Ad he doesn't have the knowledge or the maturity to distinguish between changeless Truth and theologicial opinion. That is a recipe for disaster.

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  30. Euprepius

    A brother asked the same old man, "How does the fear of God dwell in the soul?" The old man said, "If a man is possessed of humility and poverty, and if he does not judge others, the fear of God will come to him."

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  31. For many, many of us, we are done with debating teaching. Teaching is clear. Simple and clear. In order to get absolute truth taught to our children, we are going to put people debating truth on notice publicly and zealously that they are in error.

    Making judgements about teaching errors a prohibition robs people of the tools they need for grace.

    I understand and can even empathize that what you are hearing is making you uncomfortable. We are actuially very fun loving compassionate people.

    It is a counterinsurgency that should be seen for what it is without making false assumptions that you think you have us figured out.

    I was thinking about how to explain it and I remembered that Scott Hahn has a series on the algorithm of a culture with respect to moral decay and the ressurection of God in the culture. He does a much better job of explaining how renewal has repeated itself in the course of JudeoChristian history.

    It is what it is, even when imperfect people carry out the mission. Keep your eyes on the truth and the shield.

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  32. Then stop judging people Henry! Can't. Have it both ways!

    Judging truth from lies is the most critical tool the people need for their soul. Depriving them by assertions it is sinful to make judgments about whether somebody is teaching error is the antithesis of Catholic religion.

    The Pope is telling us to make the judgment calls. We are helping hands in the algorithm of renewal.

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  33. I wouldn't put Michael in the "professional Catholic" camp - he has sold nearly everything to start his ministry, and it isn't making fistfuls of dollars. I've been to his studios many many times - it ain't Hollywood (although he did invest in excellent equipment), let me tell you. He's taken his experience in the media industry to spread the faith. That he does it in a way that isn't to everyone's preference - well, big whoop.

    I know Michael personally - met him 3+ years ago, and have talked with him on many an occasion on current Church issues. He does not mince words - political correctness is not anathema to him, and his style is not for everyone.

    Michael started out with St Michael's Media, and he produces a 30 minute program called "The One True Faith" that has aired in metro Detroit on one of the local cable channels for the past 5 years or so. To me, those programs are the bone and muscle of his ministry. In my opinion, they are excellent catechetical productions - recorded with a studio audience. The internet stuff came afterward - along with his "CIA" productions. The money his ministry generates goes towards salaries of his small staff and rent and supplies (some of which are donations). This isn't some 700 Club he's running.

    And I realize that no one here said or implied that he's in this for the money - but he doesn't fit the mold of "professional Catholic" - he's a Catholic professional media personality who left the industry to spread the Gospel. Period.

    As far as the comments regarding his apparent lack of humility - well, how about we leave that for his spiritual director to deal with? I have enough trouble myself in living out that virtue - as do most people, I would like to think - and thus I'm in no position to criticize someone else's apparent insufficient display of humility for my own liking.

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  34. Ooops - should be "political correctness is anathema to him". Never mind the "not".

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  35. Thank you Larry, and like I said the man does make good points, and I agree with him probably more than 90% of the time.

    In all fairness, he's probably done a hell of a lot more for God than I have. I just don't like his approach, that's all.

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  36. Larry

    "Professional Catholics" which are being discussed ALSO live based upon their work. That is the point. It doesn't mean one has to "make it rich."

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  37. Xanthias

    The same abba said, "A dog is better than I am, for he has love and he does not judge.

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  38. michael r.3:14 PM

    A prophet? And we're to believe that the Pope endorses the work that this prophet does? I think I must be on another planet.

    I really appreciate being able to read the great comments of Henry and Mercury. It seems to me, that you guys are the ones who really nail it.

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  39. Henry - this stuck with me all day:

    "Because Voris constantly ignores much of the Catholic tradition and really conflates his American political view with Catholic orthodoxy."

    I didn't mean to start a whole thing about Voris - I just liked (superficially) what he said in the video - it fit with something I was thinking regarding a segment of women religious who are the focus of the visitation - the focus for conservative/traditional Catholics to be more exact.

    Henry, you hit on something very important that I have trouble expressing, The fact that many of us conflate our "American political view with Catholic orthodoxy." That is a great deal of the problem as I see it and experience it from many traditional/conservative groups and people. It is what I have been trying to express in many posts I think.

    You are absolutely correct saying we must examine what we say - we must have greater humility and carefully understand the terms we use:

    "There is need for humility. This is what is lacking in so much conversation on the net, especially with the blogosphere magisterium. People without humility, pushing political agendas and running their mouths against the fullness of Catholic teaching."

    I don't want to continue the debate here of who is right and who is wrong - I respect everyone's input to the discussion here. I think we need to read the book and read what the Holy Father says in context - and understand that he is not speaking ex-Cathedra.

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  40. Michael R. - I'm sure all of us can agree, we like Michael Voris' hair.

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  41. Terry,

    Right, it is good to read the book and read everything in context. And yes, the political confusion is one which we see today; of course, it is not only today, it's happened many times and will happen many times again. My own political views put me outside of the normal spectrum, which allows me to see it in a light most do not -- I mean, how many people write posts on Tsar-Martyr Nicholas II?

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  42. Larry,

    Nicely said. Isn't taking it upon yourself to say Voris lacks humility, the exact judgments people are not qualified to make?

    Nobody could possibly know this.

    I am not in Michael's league but I do very similar work. I remember early on trying to explain that people thinking they know anything about me personally by evaluating the role I am serving for Christ's Church is about as accurate as people thinking Richard Chaimberlain was really Dr. Kildaire, Sally Field could really fly and Sponge Bob is really living at Rock Bottom. You have to have a lot of humility not to let the misunderstandings roll off your back.

    I wholeheartedly agree that his use of the words is not for everyone but it is for many of us.

    Terry seems to have some very unique gifts. He wants to know truth and he listens with an open heart to everyone yet still will speak openly about his own convictions. Ok...maybe this doesn't apply to Sarah Palin!

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  43. That can't possibly be his real hair...it looks like something is sleeping on his head..

    Sara

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  44. Terry - Michael's hair shows up for 'The Vortex' taping 15 minutes before Michael does. It has the final say on lighting.

    Henry - so are parochial school teachers "professional Catholics" too? I'm not asking to be a wise guy - I'm curious as to who you define as "professional Catholics", and which ones are acceptable and which ones are not. Or is it a neutral description? Or does it describe an attitude of a person employed by the Church, and not so much the fact a person makes their living by being employed in whatever capacity by the Church.

    IMHO, the term has pejorative connotations. I wouldn't call a priest a "professional Catholic", for instance. I'm not qualified to comment on the Holy Father's use of the phrase because I haven't read his book. I intend to, though. I have found Pope Benedict to be thoughtful, challenging and direct in his expositions.

    And just for the record - I'm not a Michael Voris apologist. I only wanted to provide perspective as someone who knows him. I admire his courage to devote his life to his ministry, by walking away from a lucrative (and award-winning) job, doing what he believes to be God's will. I admit - his approach is sometimes abrasive and confrontational, but he is a faithful son of God. Of that I have no doubt.

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  45. I'm always with Larry.

    Yeah, so Sarah - don't make fun of Michael's hair - it's cool.

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  46. Ter - all this talk about Michael's hair has gotten me thinking about a future blog post...

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  47. Mr. L ~a ~r~ r ~y, (Said in a melodic fashion) If you really know the amazing Mr.Michael then tell him to tug on his ear or pick his nose on his next video in recognition of you. Then we will believe!!

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  48. belinda - maybe I should ask him to give a shout out for my blog. Wouldn't that be cool?

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  49. Dear Mr.Larry,I'm apprehensive to agree with you because those christian lions (and heretics) will wanna dine on you as well.

    *****
    I also know Michael, (But don't ask him ;) and he sent me a Christmas card with the obligatory family photos-
    His children.

    His baby girl..awww

    And his loyal companion.
    Too cute!

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  50. Anyone see his latest on the bastardization of our faith?

    :)

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Please comment with charity and avoid ad hominem attacks. I exercise the right to delete comments I find inappropriate. If you use your real name there is a better chance your comment will stay put.