Saturday, June 19, 2010

Working in the garden...


I saw him again yesterday.
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I had just finished mowing the yard and sat down for a few seconds to cool off, when I noticed a bit of movement just off to my right. Once again I saw the wild gerbil peeking out from beneath the hosta row. I stared at him for quite awhile. I could tell he was aware that I was watching him because he stood absolutely still, not even a blink of an eye or so much as a twitch of a whisker - I wouldn't even be able to tell you whether he was breathing or not.
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As I grabbed my camera to take this shot, he disappeared in the wink of the shutter. I jumped to my feet, dived to the ground, and peered into the think foliage, edging my head deeper and deeper into the darkened forest of hosta trunks. Trunks? I thought to myself, startled that I felt so small amidst the deep, dark labyrinth of hosta... I pulled back immediately, thinking I must have had too much sun, or the heat had gotten to me. I stood up immediately, brushed myself off - more to feel and demonstrate to myself I had not shrunk at all than to clean myself up. I laughed out loud that I had been momentarily frightened... Although I'd have to say startled more than anything. Nevertheless, the incident did give me pause, wondering if perhaps the gerbil, or possibly the garden itself, could be enchanted.
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I don't believe in that stuff however.
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8 comments:

  1. Ah, Terry. let the "Irish" in ya out, yeah?
    Enchanted garden?
    Works for me...but then again, I'm just a "low life" doncha know?
    Don't ya be believin' anythin' I seez:<)!
    But:
    Enjoy the "little ones" while ya can...that's it!

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  2. You are a dang trip, Terry Nelson.

    Have you seen any gnomes or fairies around?

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  3. A few years back my children where captivated by the drawings of Brian Froud & stylized their drawings in similar manner. Mr. Froud & a Prof/historian on Irish mythical creatures gave a lecture at a major bookstore in town that we attended. What amazed my children more than the lecture & mtg the personalities, was noting the people who attended & witnessing in amazement how so many of them believed the creatures were real.

    On a related matter, while visiting our favorite little tourist town, Long Grove-IL, & its Irish bookstore, we purchased a paperback book of Irish Ghosts & Hauntings whose cover used a Brian Froud drawing. One story told & introduced its tale as "extracted from the manuscript of Brother Mo Laisse, the words written as he directed, without addition or alterations." After reading that story & pondering upon the "goddess mvmt" and "all things channelled", I concluded some of these critters are being called back ... (t.b.c.)

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  4. Hostas can get that BIG???

    There is hope yet for mine...one I had thought I had lost over the inter has itty bitty leaves on it..my other one is about the size of a cantalope..

    And my roses are finally waking up..

    Sara
    Out comes the Miracle Grow!!

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  5. (continued)

    To share a section of what Fr. Mo Laisse experience one early morning ...

    "The creatures stared at me, saying nothing."

    'Why do you torment me so?' I demand. 'I am a simple man of God. I have done nothing to you.'

    One of the demons moves forward in the water. I can smell its sweat, the odour of spices and dead meat. I can hear its voice, though its mouth is not working.
    'You have destroyed us.'

    I shake my head. "I have done nothing to harm you'

    The creature moves forward, sending waves happing almost at my fee. "You create the Words of Power..." it begins. ... 'You have destroyed us.'

    I shake my head again. 'I am a simple monk; I inscribe the Gospels...'

    The creature raises its head to look at me. 'With every letter you etch, with every colour you lay, you destroy us.'
    'I do not know what you mean.'

    'We are the last of the old ones,' the figure whispers. 'You call us demons or devils, but we are neither. We are the last of the people of the goddess. Our ancestors ruled this island in the centuries before the White Christ was sacrificed on a cross of wood. Now we are nothing.'

    A second figure appears behind the speaker. This one is naked, recognisably female. Sent to tempt me. She stares at me with Large, circular eyes.

    'We were once gods,' .... 'We were worshipped by the people of this land, and while they worshipped us, we remained strong. The gods depend on the humankind for their strength; it is that belief which keeps us alive. Their faith lent us substance...'

    One has to read the rest of the story and what became of Father. ...It does make me think about Fr. Euteneuer's new book for priests ....

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  6. So, that's where my stuffed gerbil disappeared to!

    I've heard he and Mrs. Rabitowitz got a thing goin' on....

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  7. is Mrs. Rabitowitz still roaming the garden?

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  8. Anonymous2:11 PM

    I love the adventures of your wild gerbil! Now if you find a lamppost among the Hosta trunks...

    ReplyDelete


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