Saturday, August 22, 2009

Before Gay Adoption...

Notice the book on the bookshelf.

Memories

Where I get it from.
.
As some readers know, I come from a really crazy family. No big deal. Many times random memories just seem to pop-up into consciousness and they are really quite funny. It's like living in my own sitcom.
.
Anyway, my parents loved to drink, a lot. And they frequently got into fights. One night, as I was laying in bed, trying to sleep, violence erupted. My mother had a way of needling my dad - almost daring him to hit her - which he usually did. That particular night was no exception.
.
My mother hurled some insult my dad's way which forced him to leap out of his chair at the kitchen table, lunge towards my mom, grabbing one of her arms, ready to strike her with his other hand. My mother caught his arm and dug her nails into it and in a very controlled voice of quiet, yet stern authority, speaking through her teeth, commanded: "Unhand me my man!"
.
It was incredible. Dead silence, both of them were frozen in mid-action staring at one another ferociously... Then suddenly my dad burst out laughing, as did my mom. They laughed and laughed, my dad, hardly able to speak, tears rolling down his cheeks, repeating, "Unhand me my man!".
.
She tried the same thing at other times, but it never worked as well. I think it was because she added "little" to the phrase: "Unhand me little man!" - my dad hated to be called "little man".
.
Guys don't like that.

The ELCA Lutherans permit non-celibate gay clergy.

No surprise there.
.
The reason this is disappointing - to say the least - is that it acknowledges same sex relationships amongst ordained clergy by a heretofore conservative Christian denomination, and by accommodation, lends support to the same sex marriage debate within secular culture. Anyone with eyes to see and ears to hear knew this reversal of Christian teaching regarding faith and morals was coming - hence no surprise there. Consider the source.
.
Such victories come slowly however, with one step forward, two steps back, a half step back and a whole step forward again. Persistence. And infiltration - even by well meaning Christians. It has been occurring in the Catholic Church for decades, as the sex abuse scandal revealed. It is still going on, don't kid yourself. There remains a homosexual contingent within the Church, some applauding Pope Benedict's conservative reforms, who identify as same-sex attracted but celibate. Among them are those who advocate for a kinder, gentler approach to homosexuality and same-sex couples - as well as gay adoption. There are those who are open to compromise regarding faith and morals, but not liturgy, sacraments, and piety. They often accord in spirit with the most flagrant activists, especially regarding the issue of celibacy and sexual orientation.
.
As many people know, amongst the psycho-sexually-evolved, celibacy is not always equated with chastity; thus it is not necessarily a matter of sexual abstinence, rejection of intimate relationship, or a mortification of sexual attraction. In other words, there remains in the conditional celibate an openendedness to sexual experience regardless of moral consequence. Identity is key - especially if one is same sex attracted. When one's identity is entwined in sexual identity, one remains a captive to an alternative - an interior dichotomy exists - and as we know a man cannot serve two masters.
.
The fear of chaste celibacy...
.
That is what I call the resistance offered by contemporary dissidents - as if it is a sort of spiritual castration, but as one dissident Catholic theologian explains it: [Celibacy]..."this has been interpreted as refraining from all types of sexual and genital interaction in a single lifestyle, with community living offered as the antidote to meet emotional and relational needs, but in a non-sexual way.
.
This interpretation carries an inherent violence against self and others. It is a fundamental denial of our God-given identity to choose a non-sexual way of life; it is an act of blasphemy. Biologically, psychologically, and spiritually, we cannot become asexual. The more we try, the more our sexual selves will rear up in protest.
.
Our sexuality consists of all those feelings, moods, and emotions that require a certain quality and quantity of human closeness, intimacy, tactility, and love if we are to become, and help each other become, the fully evolved people that God intends us to be. To choose to forego this call is an act of violence against God, self, and other people who befriend us on the journey of life." - Diarmuid O' Murchu (Taken from Wild Reed blog, which I cannot link to because of pornographic and anti-Catholic content.)
.
This exaggerated argument is reminiscent of the Protestant Reformers objection to celibacy, newly accommodated to the gay agenda. Radical dissenters publicly embrace these and similar teachings, while some working within the Church lend a sympathetic ear or tacit approval to such errors.
.
"Beware of the false prophets, who come to you in sheep's clothing, but inwardly are ravenous wolves." (Matt. 7:15)


Friday, August 21, 2009

St. Pius X

August 21 is the feast of Pius X. I am continuing to work on my Fatima painting, "The Secret". As I was looking for some images online related to Our Lady's words, "...the Holy Father will have much to suffer..." I happened upon the following story concerning Pius X. The author, whom I respect very much and often agree with regarding some of his views on the revolution of our times, relates this anecdote suggesting Pius X could have been murdered. The only modern pope I knew of rumored to have been murdered was John Paul I, so you can imagine my surprise when I read this.
.
The mysterious death of Pio X...
.
The magazine La Critique du Liberalisme [The Critique of Liberalism] published an article about the death of St Pius X. The author sustains the thesis that St. Pius X was murdered on the order of Masonry. He affirms that St. Pius X caught a simple cold, but suddenly and inexplicably that cold would cause his death. One morning when he awakened, he could no longer speak, which was not proportional to that cold; he tried to write in order to communicate something, but also found himself unable to write. Soon afterward he died.
.
The author also tells about a young, brilliant naval officer in Prussia who became a Jesuit. After being ordained, he became a nurse and was named to take care of the Pope during that cold. On that final night of the life of St. Pius X, he was closely attending the Pope. After the Pope died, the Jesuit returned to Prussia, left the Order, and returned to a brilliant career as a naval officer. During the war he became a submarine commander. The author affirms that St. Pius X was killed on the order of the German Masonry, and therefore, would be a martyr. I repeat the thesis of this article without having formed my own opinion on it.
.
In his memoirs Cardinal Merry del Val confirms that St. Pius X could not speak or write, and he adds: “No one will ever know what happened that night.” It is a mysterious phrase. - Prof. Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira
.
I wonder if there is corroborating evidence or similar stories to support this theory? Maybe Dan Brown would know. ;)
.
[By the way - enemies of the Church have made up many things about JPI and stuff he was supposed to have said, just as they have about JPII, Paul VI, and so on - therefore I sincerely doubt Pius X or JPI were murdered. I do like a good conspiracy theory however.]

On pilgrimage...

Or vacation?
.
Did I tell you I stopped reading Weakland's memoirs, A Pilgrim In A Pilgrim Church? I lost interest, I'll probably finish it some other time. The idea of pilgrimage and monastic observance - two things Weakland ought to know about - frequently captures my imagination and attracts me spiritually. In our day the austere realities of both seem to be nearly lost from the Western consciousness. Recently I came across an interesting treatment of the ancient practice of pilgrimage and what it entails - it isn't a vacation. Read on:
.
"A pilgrimage is not simply a matter of getting to a particular shrine or holy place. It is a deliberate sundering and surrender of one's habitual conditions of comfort, routine, safety and convenience. Unlike the tourist, whose aim is to see things and travel around in conditions which are as comfortable, secure, familiar, convenient and unchallenging as possible, the pilgrim breaks with his material servitude, puts his trust in God and sets out on a quest which is inward as much as it is outward, and which is, in varying degrees, into the unknown. In this sense he becomes the image of the spiritual seeker. He removes himself as far as possible from the artificiality within which he is enclosed by his life in society. Of this spiritual exploration, inward and outward, walking is an essential part. His feet tire, his body aches, sweat drips from his head and trickles into his eyes and down his neck. He tastes rigour and hardship. But through all of this, through prayer, dedication, and confidence - slowly an inner change is wrought, a new rhythm grows, a deeper harmony. The pilgrimage is at work.
.
The way of the pilgrim is a process which must not be hurried. The bonds of routine, dependence on material comforts, on the familiar and the settled, have a far stronger hold on one than one is aware of. The conditions of modern life have so blunted the senses that it may take days or weeks even, until they begin to respond truly to the beauty about them. If the aspiring pilgrim attempts to speed this process up, or refuses to face the conditions, including the hardships, which are essential for the development of the pilgrimage, then he becomes a mere tourist. - Philip Sherrard; Athos: The Holy Mountain
.
I think it is extremely difficult for moderns to escape the world's web (www) - not only for the sake of pilgrimage, but enclosed monastic life as well. Solitude and spiritual life is inevitably compromised.

Monastic vigils and grand silence.

Enclosure.

Years ago, as a novice in a contemplative monastery I got up between 2:30 AM and 3 AM and made my way to my place in choir as soon as possible - the Office of Vigils began at 3:30 AM. After the Office, I had coffee and returned to my cell for Lectio. I loved vigils and still relish early morning prayer. It is such a wonderful time for Lectio, adoration and silent prayer. Wrapped in the silence of the night, one snuggles close to God in a secret, intimate embrace. Nothing is like it, except perhaps the thanksgiving after Holy Communion. Prayer is the life of the monk or nun.
.
Which is why I wonder about some of the time stamps on a few of the posts and comments I notice on blogs by religious. (People outside the U.S. excepted.) I cannot help but notice that some people may actually post during the grand silence - the time normally set aside for vigils. Unless of course they post-date their entries for publication at a later time - I do that frequently - I will write a post before bedtime and time it to publish shortly after midnight. (Like this one.)
.
Yeah, I bet that's what they do.

Wednesday, August 19, 2009

Minneapolis tornado interrupts Lutheran synod.

How's that for a headline?
.
It's true. Today the Evangelical Lutheran Church of America was scheduled to vote on a 34-page document that reportedly would establish a theological framework for differing views of homosexuality, that critics say would liberalize the ELCA and possibly open the door to the ordination of lesbians and gays in homosexual relationships. Voting on the document was scheduled for today, the decision on allowing clergy in same-sex partnerships is forthcoming. - Story
.
That said, this afternoon a freak tornado came out of nowhere amidst a heavy rainstorm - no warnings, no prediction of severe weather. It began in South Minneapolis, not far from the Central Lutheran Church (pictured) which happens to be a stones throw from the Minneapolis Convention Center, where the ELCA is holding its convention. The tornado nicked the church, taking a bit of the steeple, tore up tents for the Convention and evidently lifted just after it past the Convention Center - no injuries and just minor damage - but lots of scared people downtown.
.
My first thought was, "the finger of God..."! I know, people don't believe in that kind of stuff anymore. It's just a coincidence, I'm sure.
.
Or is it?
.
UPDATE: So another blog Orate Fratres picks up this story and it gets put on Spirit Daily this morning. Shouldn't I have gotten credit? I posted late yesterday afternoon. Oh! Oh! But what if other people understood the significance of the event in the same way I did? I still feel snubbed. Maybe it's because I make fun of Spirit Daily that they never pick up my stories? Maybe I should change my name to Terry Mary Nelson? Maybe I should start promoting Medj? Nah!
.
Whatever - I'm told the resolution past - the ELCA is now a gay church.
.
NEW UPDATE: No one stole this story from me - I was being dumb, stupid, silly, inappropriate. I'm sorry.

Cyberbullying



Watch your mouth - text.
.
People say things in emails and comment boxes - yes, and on blogs - stuff they may otherwise never say to someones face - kind of like screaming obscenities at drivers from the safety of your car. Insult to injury. I've done it - I try really hard not to. Although I wouldn't hesitate to say the same things face to face - been there done that. Bad dog anyway!
.
Somehow many of us think public figures, even fellow bloggers we disagree with, are fair game - on some level they may be. But there may also be consequences. No one is really anonymous online - we can be tracked. Happily I post my real name and real email address, so if anyone wants to sue me, fight with me, kill me, they can find me - the only thing phony about me is my profile photo - which looks nice, doesn't it. Anyway, I haven't gone so far as to warrant a lawsuit, and hopefully I never will. However, I've had people drop me from their links, ceased following me, wrote and told me they will never read me, and so on, but that is about it. (I'm not making any money or winning any awards for this blog, so I don't care.)
.
We all know detraction and calumny is not only sinful but unlawful - so none of us want to do that sort of thing - but what if you call someone a skank? Though perhaps uncharitable, is that a crime? I have to doubt it - BUT. News today is that a model, Liskula Cohen won a lawsuit forcing Google to reveal the identity of a blogger who insulted the model on one of his blog posts.
.
The blogger wrote: “I would have to say the first-place award for ‘Skankiest in NYC’ would have to go to Liskula Gentile Cohen,” the blogger “Anonymous” wrote in one posting. The blog, since removed, ridiculed the former Australian Vogue covergirl as a “40-something” who “may have been hot 10 years ago”, when she was actually 36.
.
Justice Joan Madden rejected the blogger’s claim that the blogs “serve as a modern-day forum for conveying personal opinions, including invective and ranting”, and should not be treated as factual assertions." - Story
.
Ms. Cohen wants the identity of the man for her attorney - so that she can sue him for defamation of character.
.
Charges of defamation of character are difficult to prove, but this case may be a good reminder for everyone online to watch what they call Sr. Chittister from now on.

On this date in history...

Imagine - 90% of the vote.
.
On August 19, 1934, about 95 percent of registered voters in Germany went to the polls and gave Hitler 38 million votes of approval (90 percent of the vote). Thus Adolf Hitler could claim he was Führer of the German nation by direct will of the people. Hitler now wielded absolute power in Germany, beyond that of any previous traditional head of state. He had become, in effect, the law unto himself.

Tuesday, August 18, 2009

As good as it gets.



"It is only recently that I have come to understand the meaning of the cross. It is at once prodigious and atrocious: prodigious because it gives us life, and atrocious because if we do not accept to be crucified all life is denied us. This is a great mystery, and blessed are the persecuted." - Jacques Fesch

Please turn the Mass back to God...


"Lift up your hearts!"
.
This photo - FOR ME - illustrates who Mass facing the people is often all about. Don't you see it? It is about the Celebrant and the people - and in this case a homecoming.
.
Please. At least bring ad orientem back.

Monday, August 17, 2009

It's been a long time coming...

And I almost think I deserve it!
.
Larry awarded me this: The Anti-Muffin Award is for "bloggers who are decidedly "Anti-Muffins". Bloggers who promote what they believe without hesitation and without fear of possible negative feedback. Bloggers who don't conform to the world's standards."
.
Thank you Larry. Visit Larry every day, even several times a day, at Acts of the Apostasy and be sure to comment... leave lots of comments... people like comments.
.
I suppose I should pass the award on, but I don't want to.

Asian Bishops and false inculturation



Can they learn from the mistakes made in the West?
.
Addressing the Asian Bishop's Conference, Cardinal Arinze had this to say regarding certain elements of false inculturation:
.

"Cardinal Arinze exhorted the continent’s bishops to follow the Church’s norms for liturgical inculturation, so that “the local Church will be spared questionable or downright mistaken innovations and idiosyncracies of some enthusiastic cleric whose fertile imaginations invents something on Saturday night and whose uninformed zeal forces this innovation on the innocent congregation on Sunday morning.”
.
The way in which Holy Communion is distributed should be clearly indicated and monitored and individual idiosyncracies should not be allowed. In the Latin Rite, only concelebrating priests take Holy Communion. Everyone else is given, be the person cleric or lay. It is not right that the priest discard any of the vestments just because the climate is hot or humid. If necessary, the Bishop can arrange the use of lighter cloth. It is altogether unacceptable that the celebrant will opt for local dress in the place of universally approved Mass vestments, or use baskets, or wine glasses to distribute the Holy Eucharist. This is inculturation wrongly understood.
.
“It is the tradition of the Church that during the Mass the readings are taken only from Holy Scriptures,” Cardinal Arinze continued. “Not even the writings of the Saints or Founders of Religious Orders are admitted. It is clear that the books of other religions are excluded, no matter how inspiring a particular text may be.”
.
“Dance in particular needs to be critically examined because most dances draw attention to the performers and offer enjoyment,” he continued. “People come to Mass, not for recreation but, to adore God, to praise and thank him, to ask pardon for their sins, and to request other spiritual and temporal needs. The monasteries may be of help in how graceful body movements can become prayer.”
.
Adoration manifests itself in such gestures in genuflection, deep bow, kneeling, prostration and silence in the presence of the Lord. Asian cultures have a deep sense of the sacred and transcendent. Reverence in Asia to civil authorities sometimes shows itself in clasped hands, kneeling, bows, prostration and walking away while facing a dignitary. It should not be too difficult to bring and elevate this cultural value to honour our Eucharistic Jesus. The fashion in some parts of the world of not installing kneelers in churches should not be copied by the Church in Asia." - Catholic Culture
.
I don't know - will they even pay attention?
.
Link:

Two steps forward

...one step back.
.
That is Obama-speak, an inversion of the old Leninist saying, 'one step forward, two steps back'. Anyway, it looks as if Obama is backing down on pushing health care so hard - the protests at local town hall meetings must be working - the President also pulled the flag website for informants spying on opponents to Obama-care. It pays to protest - loudly. Or is he just regrouping?
.
Interestingly enough I just watched a piece on network TV about the French state-run health care system - considered the best in the world - but getting overloaded. In today's news, Canadian Medical Association is saying the system is imploding: "(Canadians) have to understand that the system that we have right now - if it keeps on going without change - is not sustainable." - Source The French were saying the same thing.
.
What up? Does this mean Nationalized health-care will never be implemented in this country?
.
Who knows? At this point it may look as if it isn't going to happen any time soon - but the Trojan horse is already in the square...
.
Whatever develops, I'm willing to bet some final solution will come down the pike one way or another, sooner or later. You know, addressing the cost of treating the disabled, the mentally ill, the elderly, the poor, the underclass.

What if...


What if we are living - right now - in the era of peace Our Lady promised at Fatima? What if this is it for the New Springtime?
.
What if this is as good as it gets?

Sunday, August 16, 2009

Not the Assumption


I haven't registered or applied for clearance to comment at Fr. Z's - but he posted this image as an image of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin - it is not. It is St. Mary Magdalen in ecstasy.

Danielle Steele


.
I'm kinder intimerdatered.

Waking up at Woodstock.

Letting my freak flag fly.
.
I was never at Woodstock. Believe it or not I actually thought it was disgusting - what I saw on the news at the time that is. I was busy trying to be respectable at the time - I wore suits to work and wanted to be taken seriously. My friends from school were the ones who kept trying to make me turn on. I thought drugs were sleazy and I worried about them that they used marijuana, LSD, Mescaline, speed, and just about anything else. My drug of choice was scotch and Benson and Hedges. (To be sure, not everyone at Woodstock was a hippie - most people were there for the music, albeit most of them were high. Woodstock really just changed the cultural landscape. But I digress.)
.
Eventually my old friends managed to drag me out to a few concerts locally. I tried grass and other drugs, and really enjoyed them. Amazingly my attitude changed and I began to let my hair grow, wear jeans and neon colored t-shirts with my suit jackets, pierced my ear and quit my job before they fired me for coming in late on days I showed up at all. Then, once in awhile for fun, my friends and I would go to the drive-in to watch Woodstock - the documentary - and pretend we were there. Naturally we did attend other outdoor concerts that Woodstock popularized, where everyone was high and nice and huggy. I looked the part - but I never fit in - story of my life I guess.
.
There were always limits I wouldn't, couldn't pass. I always, always carried around within me a sense of oblivion, annihilation, doom, fear, what have you. I mixed my drugs with alcohol, which was more fun for me, and it allowed me to ignore the gnawing fear. Waking up on Sunday mornings was always the worst. I never found peace until I returned to the sacraments, until I encountered Jesus in the Blessed Sacrament. I've told that story before however.
.
Now days I usually only experience those old fears when I look back on things like Woodstock and recall the hippie-wanna-be-avant garde and cool artificial life I had constructed... or when I stray too far from Jesus in the Blessed Sacrament.
.
I'll admit it, I'm special-ed, retarded, incapable of life on my own, totally dependent - which is why I cling to Jesus in the Blessed Sacrament...
.
BTW - I went to confession last night - another encounter I need regularly, as well as a remedy for those fears of pointless annihilation that can creep up on me when I realize I spend way too much time online.
.
Finally, to be perfectly honest, I have no fond memories of Woodstock or those days - the emotions some of the music evoke are melancholic and meaningless. Purification of the memory can entail a certain amount of suffering comprised of disgust and revulsion - its a good thing.
.
Photo: Some guy at Woodstock.

Hold that thought.



"We should all take time to ponder our own martyrdom, because the time may come when we are called to give up absolutely everything for the sake of Christ." - Catholic Eye Candy Blog