Saturday, May 09, 2009

Stuff like that.

Church people stuff.
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I ran into a friend on Easter Sunday at the Cathedral. I think I told you I was happy at the Cathedral because it was so big and I could be anonymous there. Wrong. Anyway, this very dear young lady asked if I would do some painting for the presipio (Nativity) this year. I was very happy to say yes, then she mentioned that she would like to see more than a few angels and had visions of a town scape. I still thought I could do it. She gave me her card and I said I would call her. But I forgot to.
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I saw her again on Divine Mercy Sunday - I explained I forgot, but I'd call her the next day. She said she was leaving on vacation that Wednesday, so that would be good. But I forgot again.
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Now I feel guilty. I realized I don't really want to get involved - well I wouldn't mind painting a few things, but I don't know about a whole set. Then I'm scared to get involved with church people again. It's bad enough with Adoration Wednesdays at my parish.
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I can't stand the thought of being obligated to do something - which is why I do not normally do commissions. With the Wednesday thing, I have to be there to repose the Blessed Sacrament. I have to talk with the ladies too. I stopped going to daily Mass there because I have to go down for coffee - I don't like stuff like that. I just want to go to church and pray - I don't want to be on a committee or anything.
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With the Cathedral thing I'm scared of getting involved with church people again - it happened at the Church Goods Store I worked in - all the gossip, the arguments about this or that, the criticism, the holier than thou stuff - "You are so going to hell if you watch 30 Rock!" That kind of stuff. I used to catch hell when people found out I was a big Cheers fan, then Seinfeld, then Friends. People make me crazy. I get enough of that kind of crap just blogging.
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Don't scold - I'll call my friend.
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Kill all the old people.
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I watched 20/20 last night. I would like to duct-tape John Stossel's mouth shut. He had a thing on how Medicare is wasted on the elderly. He interviewed rich old people who live in Florida, who could pay for their own medical needs but take advantage of medicare - which is their right to do. Two geezers - one a billionaire - who have studied the situation claim Medicare is a waste of money. Tell that to urban elderly who can't even afford over the counter medications. Young people who have been so accustomed to being coddled with entitlements said they think it is selfish and unfair of old people to gobble up all the Social Security that they (old people) paid into all of their lives. I'd like to take those little bastards and...
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Anyway, hang onto your walkers - euthanasia is just around the corner.
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Gay bullies - there ought to be a law.
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I got an email asking, "Dear Mr. Know-it-all, why don't you ever write about lesbian issues?" First of all, I don't like lesbians - I hate it when women try to be men - which is what female masturbation is all about, as well as artificial insemination with a turkey baster. (On the other hand, male masturbation is effeminate and indicative of a weak character. Remember how athletes used to abstain from sex? And don't forget, saints are the most manly men ever.) Besides, radical feminism and lesbianism are the same isms - they are one and the same. Just ask Anne Heche and a few other high-profile celebrities who use lesbian chic to their own advantage. (I suppose Joy Behart isn't a lesbian - but rad-feminists just aren't that much different than dikes - IMHO. LOL!)
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Have you ever read Eve Tushnet?
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Speaking about misinterpreting Theology of the Body...
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Did anyone watch Nightline the other night when Christopher West was on? Terrible editing and horrible sound bites - and I don't think much of West for agreeing to it. Yeah - there's money in Theology of the Body stuff. I told you about the novice who was involved with the spiritual director priest who convinced her that Theology of the Body liberated them to have intercourse? Anyway - the story went something like that. Amateurs - all amateurs.
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Jealousy and envy.
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I'll admit it, I was once very envious of my friend Bob because he had more degrees than I did. He graduated with honors from two colleges. He earned his first degree at Lee's Barber College, and later graduated with honors from Minneapolis College of Beauty. Then he married and had two children, runs a successful salon and lives in an upscale suburb. I'm not jealous any more however.
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Jealousy and envy is a bad thing - it starts a lot of fights. I once loved to fight.
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Well, that's about it for today folks. Have a good one.

20 comments:

  1. re: Church People Stuff - I soooo understand!

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  2. Are you retro-actively competing for the Bat Shit Crazy award?

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  3. Thomnus - LOL! Kind.

    Adrienne - remember Lee's Barber College - it was downtown by the Mission.

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  4. :-p

    You should expect that kind of talk from Nazi fascists, I reckon.

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  5. That graphic is how one might portray my second SFO inquiry meeting. (The first one, everyone remembered there was a newbie around.) The Lord has funny ways of saying, "No, this isn't your calling." (He must know I laid away my brass knuckles.)

    Poor Francis..

    Some church people are fun -- the elder folks (mostly women) who count money, do mass mailings after daily Mass, visit the dying or the bed-bound. They don't miss a thing, no how, no where! If ever one needs prayer, they are the go-to people. If not for a warning/consoling wink from one of them the day Fr. D.Entendre and his female accomplice in verbal crime topped off horrifying us by saying, "See, Carol --you don't have to be afraid to horse around with a priest," I'd have lost my (still fresh) Eucharist. God bless such ladies.

    But there are the other kind, yes. Maybe I'm one of those.. what's that song line, "I'll be better when I'm older"? Hopefully.

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  6. Church people...ughhh
    I have kept to myself...until last June.
    ..................................
    You said... "I don't like Lebanese"

    Why ? I heard they can be really wonderful women, and some are awesome cooks.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lebanese_cuisine

    Do you like women who wear camos to impress their little boys?
    ;)

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  7. I think you've covered all of it, Terry. Except for the swine flu.

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  8. I hear you about wanting to be involved with God but not church people. The people I've met at the Cathedral seem nice. I haven't had substantive conversations with too many of them.

    It sounds like you didn't envision as large a project as your friend has in mind. Perfectly acceptable to tell her so and set limitations on your availability. I may be overreacting but it seems that she has a vision , which might be problematic if you don't want to be someone else's little drummer boy.

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  9. Nan - she's a wonderful lady and I fear disappointing her - but perhaps her plans may be too much for me, I will call her and discuss it with her. Thanks for your advice.

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  10. The illustration is a hoot! Terry - have been there these past two weeks myself ... oy vey! best to call and face the music ...or painting ... or whatever ... blessing will come ....

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  11. Love this post!

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  12. Church people stuff

    Wikipedia is better than Google:

    The term Communion is derived from Latin communio (sharing in common).[1] The corresponding term in Greek is κοινωνία, which is often translated as "fellowship". In Christianity, the basic meaning of the term communion is an especially close relationship of Christians, as individuals or as a Church, with God and with other Christians. This basic meaning of the word, found in many passages of the New Testament as well as in secular Greek, predates its other, more specific, Christian uses.

    The communion of saints is the relationship that, according to the belief of Christians, exists between them as people made holy by their link with Christ. This relationship is generally understood to extend not only to those still in earthly life, but also to those who have gone past death to be "at home with the Lord" (2 Corinthians 5:8). Since the word rendered in English as "saints" can mean not only "holy people" but also "holy things", the term communion of saints also applies to the sharing by members of the Church in the holy things of faith, sacraments (especially the Eucharist), and the other spiritual graces and gifts that they have in common.

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  13. This is what happens when I take a birthday hiatus?!

    You need to go dancing.

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  14. Hey Ray, You posted one of the answers to the three questions that I have been asking God today. Everyone else knew this stuff, but not me. I am confused about it. I am going to print a copy for myself . I really wanted to know what the communion of saints means. How does God call us to participate in this communion of Saints, and how is this applied to our everyday lifes?

    Now I will look to see it you post the other two answers to the questions that I have been pestering God about.

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  15. Belinda:

    Note "everybody" is knowledgeable about the "communion of saints" as it respects to living people, especially themselves. I'm not. I'm kind of like Terry, not too sociable in Church. But I don't post about it. That's why I looked it up.

    I must admit, my new parish is much smaller and I am a lot more sociable there since I can recognize people and I would have to be an a-1 anti-social idiot not to at least acknowledge them.

    Frankly it's nice to go to Mass where people know me, even if I don't talk to them.

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  16. Belinda, again; Answer 2:

    Just guessing, the "Communion of Saints" is part of one group of three that I can think of, the last sentence in the Apostles Creed.

    This one, I kind of understand and am extremely grateful for its existence.

    Catholic.com (Catholic Answers, a wonderful group in San Diego) wrote this:

    For sins committed after baptism, a different sacrament is needed. It has been called penance, confession, and reconciliation, each word emphasizing one of its.aspects. During his life, Christ forgave sins, as in the case of the woman caught in adultery (John 8:1–11) and the woman who anointed his feet (Luke 7:48). He exercised this power in his human capacity as the Messiah or Son of man, telling us, "the Son of man has authority on earth to forgive sins" (Matt. 9:6), which is why the Gospel writer himself explains that God "had given such authority to men" (Matt. 9:8).

    Since he would not always be with the Church visibly, Christ gave this power to other men so the Church, which is the continuation of his presence throughout time (Matt. 28:20), would be able to offer forgiveness to future generations. He gave his power to the apostles, and it was a power that could be passed on to their successors and agents, since the apostles wouldn’t always be on earth either, but people would still be sinning.

    God had sent Jesus to forgive sins, but after his resurrection Jesus told the apostles, "‘As the Father has sent me, even so I send you.’ And when he had said this, he breathed on them, and said to them, ‘Receive the Holy Spirit. If you forgive the sins of any, they are forgiven; if you retain the sins of any, they are retained’" (John 20:21–23). (This is one of only two times we are told that God breathed on man, the other being in Genesis 2:7, when he made man a living soul. It emphasizes how important the establishment of the sacrament of penance was.)

    Just as the apostles were to carry Christ’s message to the whole world, so they were to carry his forgiveness: "Truly, I say to you, whatever you bind on earth shall be bound in heaven, and whatever you loose on earth shall be loosed in heaven" (Matt. 18:18).

    This power was understood as coming from God: "All this is from God, who through Christ reconciled us to himself and gave us the ministry of reconciliation" (2 Cor. 5:18). Indeed, confirms Paul, "So we are ambassadors for Christ" (2 Cor. 5:20).

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  17. I understand what you mean about "church people." That sort of drama completely tore apart the church I grew up in (Protestant "church stuff" but still "church stuff.") I didn't think I'd want to be involved again afterwards--when I joined the Catholic Church I thought I'd just go to Mass and be left alone. But I really enjoyed what I learned in my RCIA class and now I miss being there. I think it's the involvement I miss, rather than the people though, even though I get lonely for people to discuss things with. I wish I could find an organization to be involved in there to be a defender of the Church and the unborn, but as of now I've not found one I quite fit with So I wander blogland...

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  18. I once heard a convert wife of a former pastor on the Journey Home. She said, especially as a minister's wife "There is no pleasing the people of God."

    How true.

    Thank you for posting this.

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  19. Regarding the Church people - go anyway, & skip the coffee...

    Alternatively, stay to pray & light some candles, then exit out a side door - it works for me, although winding a path through a crowd really isn't all that difficult - just take a deep breath & go:)

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